October 2007

Womens cricket in Calgary -- Posted Wednesday, October 31 2007

The Calgary cricketers had a promising start to their women's cricket program with a training session and two games with the Victoria Wickets Maidens.

This spurred some further interest in July-September and they had a regular group of 10-15 women practicing and playing together on Saturday mornings at Riley Park.

"Next year we will make more progress with a regular May start to the program, (complete with a couple of dedicated coaches), greater participation (now that we know there's considerable interest), and work the group up to get comfortable with some hard-ball play so that we can field a majority women's team against the Wicket Maidens, as they hopefully will be touring Calgary again in July, 2008."


ICC Intercontinental Cup -- Posted Tuesday, October 30 2007

Kenya sweats on Obanda’s fitness as Bermuda hopes for improved performance in ICC Intercontinental Cup match starting Thursday

Kenya is sweating on the fitness of batsman Alex Obanda while Bermuda is hoping for an improvement in form as the two sides prepare to go head-to-head in the ICC Intercontinental Cup match in Nairobi from Thursday.

19-year-old Obanda, who averages over 45 from eight first-class matches, was carried off during the second ODI against Bermuda last Saturday after twisting his right ankle after stepping on the rope.

According to Kenya coach Alfred Boi Njuguna, Obanda has been in severe pain but a decision on his selection will not be made until Thursday morning. “His ankle is still strapped but the pain has subsided. He will undergo further X-rays later in the day after which we will exactly know the extent of his injury,” said Njuguna on Tuesday.

“I have no hesitation in saying that I would not like to play without him. He is not only a player with a lot of promise and potential but is someone who bolsters the middle-order,” he added.

Obanda scored an invaluable 83 in the previous Intercontinental Cup game against Canada and featured in a 122-run third wicket partnership with David Obuya (72) that laid the foundation of a first innings score of 393 which eventually resulted in a nine-wicket victory in the African side’s competition opener.

In the two ODIs against Canada, Obanda had scores of 30 and 85 while he stroked a match-winning 79 against Bermuda in the first ODI.

“You always want to persist with young talent because it is an investment for the future. Obanda is a player who has earned a lot of respect from his team-mates because of his professional attitude and commitment,” continued Njuguna.

Kenya, since its two disappointing performances in the ICC World Twenty20 in South Africa in September, has played exciting cricket. Besides comfortably winning its ICC Intercontinental Cup match against Canada, it has also won all five of its ODIs against Canada and Bermuda.

Njuguna wants to carry forward that momentum and also expects his players to maintain the same aggressive attitude. “We turned things around for us by playing positively and aggressively, and I would like to see the same approach in this game,” he said.

“Like any other opponent, we will respect Bermuda and will try to play as hard as possible. A 3-0 (ODI series) victory was thoroughly celebrated but that is now something of the past. In the forthcoming four-day match, we will have to stay focused and composed without taking things for granted,” Njuguna added.

The Kenya coach also warned that the match is likely to be hard work for the bowlers. “Traditionally Nairobi Gymkhana has always been a batsman’s paradise. We managed to wrap-up our match against Canada with a day to spare because we attacked the three sticks and that’s what we will have to do this time.

“My advice to the bowlers will be to bowl as straight as possible, keep patience and wait for the batsmen to make mistakes,” he said.

Bermuda, on the contrary, has so far struggled to live up to its lofty reputation, gained by virtue of its qualification to this year’s ICC Cricket World Cup in the West Indies. In this competition it has lost both its matches to the Netherlands (by an innings and 44 runs) and Ireland (by an innings and 146 runs) and goes into this game with that defeat in the ODI series against Kenya.

However, Bermuda coach and former West Indies batsman Gus Logie has emphasizes that his team’s indifferent performance is a result of several factors. “Our difficulties stem from different things, starting from the players’ non-availability to lack of playing facilities. But we continue to work hard and take them as new challenges,” he said.

“For this game, we have the services of a few experienced players and I am sure if the batsmen succeed in putting decent runs on the board, we will perform better than the previous games.

“In the ODI series against Kenya, we showed signs of improvement and that’s what we have to continue to do,” said Logie who played 52 Tests and 158 ODIs for the West Indies between 1981 and 1993.

Logie dispelled the impressions that Bermuda U/19 team’s qualification for next year’s ICC U/19 Cricket World Cup has put pressure on his team. “These are two different levels of the game and cannot be compared. And I think we were the ones who inspired the youngsters after qualifying for the ICC Cricket World Cup this year.

“People want to look at our victories but don’t consider the fact that this team has put Bermuda on the cricket map after putting up a series of excellent performances.”

The umpires for the match will be Brian Jerling from South Africa, of the Emirates International Panel, and Buddhi Pradhan from Nepal, of the ICC Associates and Affiliates Umpires International Panel.

The ICC Intercontinental Cup has quickly grown in stature and profile since its inception three years ago and now ICC's premier first-class tournament is an integral part of the Associate Members’ cricket schedule.

Having previously been designed around a two-group, three-day format, the event has evolved into an eight-team, round-robin and truly global tournament featuring four-day cricket which gives those teams who do not play Test cricket the chance to experience the longer form of the game.

Scotland won the first ICC Intercontinental Cup in 2004, beating Canada in the final, while Ireland has been victorious in both events since then, beating Kenya in the 2005 decider and Canada earlier this year in the 2006/07 event.

The final of the ICC Intercontinental Cup 2007/08 will take place in November 2008 at a venue yet to be decided.

Kenya squad:-
Steve Tikolo (captain), Thomas Odoyo, Alex Obanda, Collins Obuya, Peter Ongondo, Nehemiah Odhiambo, Maurice Ouma, Elijah Otieno, Hiren Variaya, David Obuya, James Kimande, Tony Suji, Lameck Onyango, Alfred Luseno.

Bermuda squad:-
Irving Romaine (captain), David Hemp, Dwayne Leverock, Lionel Cann, Jekon Edness, Stephen Outerbridge, James Celestine, Kevin Hurdle, Rodney Trott, Malachi Jones, Tamauri Tucker, Jeneiro Tucker, Kyle Hodsoll, Azeem Pitcher, Kian Butterfield.

Umpires: Brian Jerling and Buddhi Pradhan







Points Table (as at 30 October)




P WO WI D LI LO T Points

Netherlands 3 2 - - - 1 - 34
Ireland 2 1 - 1 - - - 29
Scotland 3 1 - 2 - - - 26

Canada 4 1 - - - 3 - 26

Kenya 1 1 - - - - - 20
Namibia 1 1 - - - - - 20
UAE 2 - - 1 - 1 - 3
Bermuda 2 - - - - 2 - 0




WO - outright win - 14 pts
WI - lead on first innings (also retained if outright loss) - 6 pts
LI - behind on first innings - 0 pts
LO - outright loss - 0 pts
TO - outright tie - 7 pts each
TI - tie first innings - 3 pts each Abandoned - 10 pts each



For full scorecards from all ICC Intercontinental Cup matches to date and information on the competition go to: http://www.icc-cricket.com/icc/events/intercontinental/


Material sourced from ICC Press release.


Meraloma Athletic Club, Vancouver -- Posted Tuesday, October 30 2007

The Meraloma Athletic Club was founded in 1923 as a swim club and currently hosts the sports of Rugby, Cricket, Soccer, Field Hockey, Softball and Basketball for men, women and juniors.

The Meralomas have a tradition and reputation of producing quality players and coaches who have represented the Club at their sport at the City, Provincial and National Level.
We are located in Kitsilano, the heart of the beach side district of Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. Our Meraloma Clubhouse is operated in a 1923 vintage Parks and Recreation structure on Connaught Park. It contains memorabilia from generations of athletes and touring teams from the world over.

Currently there are over 400 active male and female 'Loma members, 100 associates and numerous alumni connected to the sporting sections. This includes a strong presence from our Canadian Football Alumni. The Meralomas are actively support and encourage participation in the community based activities by all of our members.

Mission Statement
The Meraloma Athletic Club sponsors and promotes organized athletic team sports at all levels. We foster goodwill, personal development, respect and sportsmanship among our members and the community. We affiliate with local, national and international organisations and leagues to enable our teams to compete at the highest levels desired. We achieve our goals by sound management of our club and facilities.

Information sourced from:-

http://www.meraloma.com/


Namibia captain Bjorn Kotze praises fast bowlers -- Posted Monday, October 29 2007

Namibia captain Bjorn Kotze praises fast bowlers efforts in victory against Canada.

Some of the key players might miss next away games in ICC Intercontinental Cup.

Captain Bjorn Kotze described the efforts of his fast bowlers as “marvellous” after Namibia defeated Canada by eight wickets in its ICC Intercontinental Cup opener at Wanderers Cricket Club in Windhoek, Namibia on Sunday.

Namibia’s pacers picked up 18 of the 20 Canadian wickets to fall as the tourists were forced to follow-on on a wicket which, according to Kotze, lacked any lateral seam movement.

The new ball duo of Gerri Synman and Louis Klazinga did the bulk of the bowling and finished with match figures of 29.1-5-116-7 and 29-4-82-6 respectively. Ian van Zyl lent them excellent support and picked up 4-57 from 16 overs in the match.

Their efforts were even more impressive considering the trio got through 63 overs between them in a three-day match the previous week.

“The fast bowlers showed tremendous commitment by bowling with the same fire and venom throughout in warm weather conditions. It was their marvellous effort that earned the team 20 invaluable points,” said Kotze who himself scored a career-best 163 not out in the match.

“And if you take into account their workload in the previous match, it was nothing less than a superb achievement in which they not only showed their ability but also displayed their high fitness levels.

“The result might reflect that it was a comfortable victory but the fact of the matter is that it was a tough game that tested our temperament, patience and talent in different situations,” said Kotze.

Electing to bat first, Namibia slumped to 135-5 before the lower-middle order helped Kotze to take the score to an imposing 480-9 declared. Then when Namibia fielded, twice it pulled itself back in the match after Canada appeared to be taking the match to a draw.

In the first innings after Canada reached 232-4, Namibia picked up six wickets for 54 runs to dismiss the visitors for 286 and force a follow-on. Then in the second innings, Canada was cruising nicely at 192-2 before the home team grabbed eight wickets for 103 runs to bowl out the tourists out for 295.

The required 102 runs for victory proved to be a walk in the park for Namibia which achieved the target in 21 overs for the loss of two wickets.

“I think Canada played good competitive cricket but missed a couple of experienced players. I also feel the bounce of the surface was not to their liking.

“(Opener) Mohammad Iqbal played exceptionally well in both innings and without belittling his superb efforts, I think we didn’t field as well as should have and dropped him a few times.

“We not only need to improve our fielding, the batsmen also need to learn how to converting good starts into big scores. I think it is premature to discuss our prospects in the competition at this stage as there is plenty of cricket still to be played.

“I mean we have played just one match and there are teams which have played three or even four matches. Obviously, we want to be right up there but it is dependent on several factors.

“Among other things, players’ availability is of paramount importance and as things stand at present, I think some of the key players, including myself, might not be available for next year’s away games in United Arab Emirates (UAE) and Kenya because of work commitments.

“I am not particularly concerned with the fact that our next ICC Intercontinental Cup match is four months away as we have plenty of domestic cricket and a few one-day games as well. My only worry is that for important games, we might not be at full strength because of work commitments,” he said.

While Namibia has collected 20 points from the match, Canada’s third defeat in four matches has dented its hopes of repeating its last event’s performance in the previous event when it reached the final before losing to Ireland. Canada’s remaining games are against Ireland, Scotland and Bermuda.

The Netherlands leads the field with 34 points from three matches followed by Ireland on 29 points but from two matches. Canada and Scotland share third place on 26 points while Kenya and Namibia share fifth place on 20 points. UAE and Bermuda are winless from two matches each but UAE are seventh after collecting three points from a rained-off game against Scotland.

The remaining two matches in the ICC Intercontinental Cup in 2007 involves Bermuda, which will play a double-header. It goes head to head with Kenya in Nairobi from Thursday and then travel to Sharjah where will take on the UAE the following week.

The ICC Intercontinental Cup has quickly grown in stature and profile since its inception three years ago and now ICC's premier first-class tournament is an integral part of the Associate Members' cricket schedule.

Having previously been designed around a two-group, three-day format, the event has evolved into an eight-team, round-robin and truly global tournament featuring four-day cricket which gives those teams who do not play Test cricket the chance to experience the longer form of the game.

Scotland won the first ICC Intercontinental Cup in 2004, beating Canada in the final, while Ireland has been victorious in both events since then, beating Kenya in the 2005 decider and Canada earlier this year in the 2006/07 event.

The final of the ICC Intercontinental Cup 2007/08 will take place in November 2008 at a venue yet to be decided.

Report sourced from:-
ICC MEDIA RELEASE
Dubai, 29 October 2007


CEO of CCA -- Posted Monday, October 29 2007

The Canadian Cricket Association has appointed its first chief executive following a four-month search. Atul Ahuja, an Indian-born Canadian citizen with extensive business experience, will take up the role on November 1.

Ahuja has held senior level executive positions with several international companies in India, the United States and Canada, most recently with Satyam Computer Services and Intelligroup Inc., both in the information technology field.

Our Response:
Ben Sennick clone appointed as Canada’s new cricket CEO.
The press release of the CCA heralds the appointment of Atul Ahuja but we suggest the appointment moves Canadian cricket further in the direction of the oligopolies that control the game. We predict that if the appointment is confirmed. Mr. Ahuja will move to get rid of the independent CCA webpage as a cost saver measure.

Mr. Ahuja’s intecedents like Mr. Sennik are corporate. Not that there is anything wrong with that. In an article titled “Now There is a Good Bet” in March of 2007 we reported that Satyam listed on the NASDAQ, and a company to which Mt Atul Ahuja seems to have a close connection, was a joint owner of “cricinfo” with Wisden. Wisden sold its interest in Cricinfo to Disney, a NYSE listed company in the spring of 2007. Canadian Cricket then moved to appoint a former Satyam executive Mr. Ahuja as CEO in September, 2007.

Among the job prerequisites of the CEO of Canadian cricket was “bi-lingual French and English.” In apparent rejection of the job description the CCA appoints as its CEO a non French speaker. The main qualification of the new CEO appears to be that he moves in the rarefied air where community values are sacrificed to the almighty dollar. Is this the type of individual we want as CEO of Canadian Cricket? A Ben Sennick clone with the mindset to make the same errors in judgment.

We have the following questions. When it was determined that no candidate fulfilled the bi-lingual language requirement or the language requirement was discarded, why was the job not reposted? What is Mr., Ahuja’s solution to the present difficulties wish the Ontario government and auditor general? Will the CCA continue to accept money for Ontario only projects or personnel from either the Ontario government in the ICC? How are the financial requirements the various CCA trust to be kept separate from CCA operations?

Article sourced from http://www.cricketclub.org/

Editorial comment :-
Plus ça change plus c'est la même chose!!!(JH)


Ontario Ladies Cricket Club -- Posted Sunday, October 28 2007

Ontario Ladies Cricket Club (henceforth referred to as the OLC2).

The newly formed Ontario Ladies Cricket Club - OLC2 is coming up the track with such an impact that it clearly warrants attention. What distinguishes this club is the various levels of vibrant energy and cohesion that seems so natural among these professional, mature and goal oriented women, after all, their motto is ‘we are all about cricket’®

The OLC2 is extremely proud to have an experienced international player, Canada’s own Ms. Janet John-Dorie. One of Guyana’s best exports, Ms. John-Dorie has achieved fame as being recognized as the most talented female wicket keeper in Canada and one would be amazed to discover the passion for cricket from this 55 year old, the oldest current international cricketer. ‘It is my passion for the game that has led me to persevere and give birth to this club, I see cricket as my husband and these ladies as my children.’

Indeed the ladies consider themselves fortunate to have Janet as the President of the Executive Committee and most importantly as the team mentor and wicket keeper who has almost 50 years of experience under her belt.

Truly representing Ontario’s diversity, the ladies come from many different backgrounds and each possesses their own unique style and quality.


The Executive committee consists of:-

*Deshanee Yahathugoda, played cricket in Sri Lanka, is an Electrical Engineering Designer by profession, and will serve as the Treasurer and Team Captain.

*Arti Deonarine, an Assistant Vice President with her company, is the club’s Secretary and played for her high school in Trinidad.

*Santhiya Rajaram, a Zoologist by profession, serves as Vice-President and the team’s Vice- Captain, with roots from Tamil Nadu in Southern India where she played cricket at State level.

* Saba Bhatti, a student, serves as the team’s Sports Coordinator, originally from Pakistan with years of experience.

*Amrita Jaipaul, a former television Studio Manager from Guyana, is given the fitting task as Assistant Treasurer.

Other positions in this club are filled by:-

*Mr. Daminda Udumalagala, Team Manager, (an Electrical Engineer by profession), originally from Sri Lanka.

*Mr. Rehan Bhatti, a student, is the Assistant Team Manager originally from Pakistan.

Mr. Amjad Khan, currently a banking professional, who has volunteered to be the Coach.

Special status has been awarded and graciously accepted by the following:-

Mr. Austin Ward – Honorary Member
Mr. Eddie Norfolk – Special Member
Ms. Sandi Hennessy – Special Member (www.candacricket.com web-site operator)
Mr. Sherriff Boodhoo – Special Member (Quasra Sport)


Janet, like a proud parent is eager to state that, ‘from the time we all came on board, we have started our practice sessions, held meetings according to protocol and continue to maintain our clear visions and ambitions.’ She continues, ‘I applaud people like Mr. Ward who has made tremendous donations to our team. Mr. Norfolk is an assiduous photographer who guides us with his commentaries supported by pictures. Mr. Martin Vieira is praised for his prestigious support and positive encouragement. Thanks to Jon Harris and his lovely wife Sandi Hennessy.


The OLC2 is certainly well grounded and will be going places. The team is currently inviting members of the public to submit an application to become a team member.

Contact information:-

E-mail: ontariolcc@yahoo.ca
Tel: 416.506.1431
647.889.4209
416.532.6285
416.571.1401


Editorial comment:-

So, the Wicket Maiden's of Vancouver Island and Ladies of Montreal are now joined by the OLC2 club in Ontario.
Where are the women cricketers in other major cricket centres across Canada?
Canadacricket.com is a forum for all cricketers from coast to coast ... for the love of the game. (JH).


Canada- Namibia Day 4: Namibia win by 8 wickets -- Posted Saturday, October 27 2007
When play resumed on Day 4, Canada had 4 wickets left, and led by just 41. @0 more runs were added before Bhatti was bowled by Snyman and when skipper Dhaniram was out for 31, Namibia were into the tail. Shamshudeen (25*) showed some resistance but Canada were all out for 295, a lead of just 101.

Osinde gave Canada a glimmer of hope when he had Van Schoor caught behind in the third over. At lunch Namibia were 14/1. Nam,ibia lost another wicket on 35, but had little trouble reaching their target.


CricInfo live card


Kotze century puts Namibia in charge -- Posted Saturday, October 27 2007

Namibia v Canada, Intercontinental Cup, Windhoek, 2nd day


Canada 233 for 4 (Iqbal 119*) trail Namibia 480 for 9 dec (B Kotze 163*) by 247 runs

Namibia's captain, Bjorn Kotze, converted his overnight 87 into a magnificent unbeaten 163, as his team compiled an imposing total of 480 for 9 declared on the second day against Canada at Windhoek. By the close, however, Canada were fighting hard on 233 for 4, through the efforts of their opener, Mohammad Iqbal, who was unbeaten on 119.
But the main man of the day was Kotze, who brought up his maiden first-class century during the morning session, and went on to bat for 345 balls and more than six-and-a-half hours to ensure his platform did not go to waste. He received strong support from the tail - most notably the No. 9, Kola Burger, who made 47, and the last man Louis Klazinga (19), as the last four wickets added a healthy 166 to Namibia's overnight total of 314 for 6.

Canada's bowlers stuck to their task. They were without the services of the medium pacer, Durand Soraine, who had taken three wickets on the first day, but their spinner and captain, Sunil Dhaniram, kept chipping away and finished with 3 for 58 from 28 overs. He was unable to separate Namibia's last pair, however, and Kotze eventually declared after a tenth-wicket stand of 58.

After a lengthy stint in the field, Canada's openers were vulnerable to an early strike and sure enough, Abdul Jabbar was bowled by Klazinga for 2 as Namibia looked to make early inroads. Klazinga was again on target to remove Trevin Bastiampillai for 13, and when Ian van Zyl accounted for Qaiser Ali (19), Canada were shakily placed at 83 for 3. But Iqbal ensured that they would fight on into the third day.

Report sourced from:-
http://content-www.cricinfo.com/icccont2007/content/story/317200.html


Canada made to fight against battling Namibia -- Posted Friday, October 26 2007

Namibian captain Bjorn Kotze battled his way to a career-best 87 runs not out on the opening day of Canada's Intercontinental Cup match on Thursday (October 25). He came in to bat with Namibia on 81 runs for 3 wickets and progressively steered his side to a solid first innings score of 314 runs for 6 wickets.

Kotze lost opening batsman Raymond van Schoor on 134 runs soon after the pair had added 50 runs for the fourth wicket. Opening bat van Schoor contributed 46 runs. Canada struck quickly to make it 135 runs for 5 wickets as Sunil Dhaniram removed Deon Kotze, but the rest of the day went mostly the home team's way.

Kotze added 94 runs with Nicolaas Scholtz for the 6th wicket, before the 20-year-old Scholtz fell to off-spinner Jason Patraj for 64 runs, also a career best. Wicketkeeper Tobias Verwey added some spark to the innings, scoring at a run a ball. He and Kotze partnered for an unbroken 7th wicket stand of 85 runs by close of play. Verwey was 49 runs not out and Berger 87 runs not out.

The 25-year old Verwey has a previous best of 114 runs scored in December 2006 against the United Arab Emirates. So far, he has faced 48 deliveries, hitting 6 boundaries and one six. Skipper Berger rests overnight with thoughts of a first century in first-class cricket. His 215-ball stay includes 8 boundaries.

Durand Soraine, a 24-year old, who took 3 of the first 4 wickets to fall, was Canada's most successful bowler. His wickets came at a cost of 54 runs from 15.4 overs. A day of learning what first-class cricket can be about, but progress. Henry Osinde struck early to remove opening bat AJ Burger for 9 runs.

The Canadian bowlers stuck to the task against a young Namibian side that participates in the South African Airways Provincial Championship. Canada had not conceded a wide or a no-ball in the closing score of 314 runs.

The game plan for day two will be straightforward for both sides. Canada's will hope for an early breakthrough, then swift removal of the next three batsmen. Namibia will be hoping to keep the runs flowing and put pressure on the visitors.


*** Nairobi (Oct 25) Kenya stormed to an 8-wicket win over Bermuda in the first of three ODIs in Nairobi. Bermuda was all out for 174 runs in the 42nd over, Lionel Cann top-scoring with a typically forceful 52 runs (9x4, 1x6). Peter Ongondo took 3 wickets for 16 runs in 7 overs.
Kenya raced home inside 29 of the possible 50-overs, thanks to 46 runs from opening bat Maurice Ouma, 79 runs not out from young Alex Obanda and 42 runs not out from veteran skipper Steve Tikolo. Ouma and Obanda added 104 runs for the second wicket. Obanda and Tikolo posted 70 runs in an unbroken third wicket stand.

Eddie Norfolk


Captain Kotze boosts Namibia -- Posted Friday, October 26 2007

Namibia 314 for 6 (B Kotze 87*, Scholtz 64, Verwey 49*, Soraine 3-54) v Canada


Bjorn Kotze played a captain's innings as Namibia fought back to edge the opening day of their Intercontinental Cup match against Canada at Windhoek. Most of Namibia's batsmen made starts, but it was Kotze and Nicholaas Scholtz, adding 94 for the fifth wicket, who made life tougher for the visitors.

For once Umar Bhatti, Canada's opening bowler, failed to make early inroads and instead that role went to Henry Osinde as he had Jan-Berrie Burger caught behind.

Seventeen-year-old debutant Raymond van Schoor made an impressive start with nine boundaries in his 46, adding 59 with fellow new-boy Michael Durant, but Namibia stumbled against the medium pace of Durand Soraine.

van Schoor edged to the keeper and Durant was trapped lbw, then with a recovery in operation Soraine struck again to remove Gerrie Snyman (35). When Deon Kotze was caught for a duck off Sunil Dhaniram the innings was threatening to unravel.

Kotze, though, put his head to begin a lengthy battle while Scholtz was equally determined in a partnership spanning nearly 40 overs. It wasn't thrilling cricket, but suited Namibia's needs down to the ground. When the bad balls came along both players dispatched them as Dhaniram tried eight bowlers.

The breakthrough came from the offspin of Jason Patraj when he ended Scholtz's stubborn 123-ball innings. But the day closed in a flurry of runs as Tobias Verwey moved to 49 off 48 balls, adding 85 in 19 overs with Kotze who ended 13 short of his century.

Report sourced from:-

http://content-www.cricinfo.com/icccont2007/content/story/317046.html


Namibia v Canada preview (CricInfo) -- Posted Thursday, October 25 2007
Namibia have announced their squad for the Intercontinental Cup match at home against Canada in November. Although some teams, including Canada, have played three matches, this match will be Namibia's opening match of the campaign.

They are due to play a further six matches in the competition that was revamped to a round robin format this year, but these fixtures have not yet been released.

The13-man squad includes three of the under-19 side which unexpectedly qualified for the next World Cup - Morne Engelbrecht, Ray van Schoor and Ewald Steenkamp.

The four-day match starts on November 25. Engelbrecht and van Schoor had a chance to see what Canada are like, when they, along with fellow squad members Wibur Slabber and Michael Durandt, played for Namibia A in a 50-over warm-up match at Windhoek on Wednesday.

Canada won that match easily, by six wickets, but they won't be expecting an easy time of it against the full side next month.

In the Intercontinental Cup, Canada have so far won one and lost two, and the squad they have in Africa at the moment is far from their first-choice side.

Squad:- J.B. Burger, Raymond van Schoor, Bjorn Kotzé (capt), Gerrie Snyman, Michel Durandt, Nicolaas Scholtz, Tobie Verwey, Ian van Zyl, Kola Burger, Louis Klazinga, Wilber Slabber, Morné Engelbrecht, Ewald Steenkamp.


Report sourced from:-
http://content-www.cricinfo.com/icccont2007/content/story/316778.html


Namibia A v Canada -- Posted Wednesday, October 24 2007

Namibia A v Canada, Windhoek

Canada's batsmen come up trumps

Cricinfo staff
October 24, 2007

Canada 274 for 4 (Qaiser Ali 73, Kandappah 62*, Dhaniram 58*) beat Namibia 271 for 5 (Williams 132) by six wickets

Canada's batsmen carried them to a six-wicket win over Namibia A in a warm-up match in Windhoek.

What will worry the Canadians is that none of their bowlers were able to keep the Namibians in check. Craig Williams, a 23-year-old with a first-class average of 112, was the mainstay of the innings with 132 and with the exception of 17-year-old Sean Silver, who fell for 5 in the fifth over, all of the batsmen made reasonable contributions.

Canada lost Aftab Shamsudeen, run out three balls into their reply, and then Abul Jabbar for a six-ball 14, but thereafter they batted sensibly in what was a well-paced chase. Trevin Bastiampillai and Qaiser Ali put them ahead of the clock and then some all-out attack by the veteran pairing of Arvind Kandappah and Sunil Dhaniram steered them home with six overs to spare.

Match report sourced from:-
http://content-www.cricinfo.com/kenyavcan/content/story/316789.html


Heartlake Cricket Club -- Posted Wednesday, October 24 2007

BRAMPTON - Heartlake Cricket Club won the Etobicoke and District Cricket League's Premier Division with a 5-wicket win against Elmbank.

Elmbank won the toss and decided to bat, but the innings never got into gear. A few defiant shots near the end took the total to 122 runs all out. Enos Charles took 3 wickets for 28 runs.

Brampton-based Heartlake's innings was based on a solid 50 runs from opening batsman Eddie Williams. Victory came with 23 overs to spare.

Both Premier finalists had piled up a 300-plus total in semi-final matches, but Abdool Samad was unable to repeat his heroics of scoring 140 runs not out, made for Elmbank against Calypso, in the final. Heartlake's Arthur John had made 118 runs against GT Sports.

First Div.
Young Titans took the First Division title on the adjacent field at Centennial Park, Etobicoke, against Cosmos.
Cosmos made 131 runs all out. There was tension on both sides, climaxing as Titans moved to 134 runs for 7 wickets, and the victory.

After 18 overs, Titans had scored 73 runs but lost 5 wickets. Two of the lower order batsmen brought home victory by following the basics of playing down the line of the ball.

The match-clinching partnership saw Ankur reach 15 runs not out and Tahir 20 runs not out. Opening batsman Lalit made 40 runs. Cosmos' Tarish took 4 wickets for 39 runs.
CCCA Toronto Premier Div.

Apollo beat Georgetown by 3 wickets to secure the Canadian Commonwealth Cricket Association of Toronto's Premier Division championship.

A century stand for the third wicket between Irfan Rabbini (55 runs) and Harvinder Singh (51 runs) provided the backbone for Apollo's innings.

Georgetown then made some breakthroughs once the main stand had ended. However Vijay Singh, the Apollo captain, steered his side to victory with an innings of 33 runs not out.


Heartlake wins District Premier Div.
The Brampton Guardian
Article by EDDIE NORFOLK
Friday October 12 2007

Report sourced from:- http://www.thebramptonguardian.com/saf/sports/article/35457


Canada - Kenya 1982-2007 (Updated) -- Posted Tuesday, October 23 2007
CANADA V KENYA 1982 -2007 (Updated)

(One Day Matches)

Kenya has won 11*, Canada has won 2
HS: F.Kirmani 107; BB:J.Davison 3-15

1982 (ICC Trophy): 242-8 (*60 overs game) (F.Kirmani 107); Kenya 197 (C.Neblett 4-26) WON by 45 runs

1994 (ICC Trophy): 210-9 (P.Prashad 84); Kenya 213-7 (B.Singh 2-14) Lost by 3 wkts

1997 (ICC Trophy): 143-8 (I.Liburd 28); Kenya 303-6 (S.Seeram 3-46) Lost by 168 runs

2002 (6-Nations Series): 138 (A.Codrington 32); Kenya 239-8 (.D.Joseph 3-61) Lost by 101 runs

2003 (World Cup): 197(I.Billcliff 71): Kenya 198 (J.Davison 3-15) Lost by 4 wkts

2006 (Official ODI): 129 (G.Codrington 40); Kenya 237-9 (S.Thuraisingham 4-35) Lost by 108 runs 94 (G.Barnett 35); Kenya 97-5 (J.Davison 3-43) Lost by 5 wkts

2007(Tri-Nation Series): 213-9 (A.Samad 50); Kenya 144 (K.Sandher 3-24) WON by 69 runs
* No scores. Canada lost on walkover, unable to field a team due to illness

2007 (WCL Div 1): 92 (G.Codrington 24); Kenya 250-9 (H.Osinde 4-33) Lost by 158 runs

2007 (World Cup): 199 (G.Barnett 41); Kenya 203-3
Lost by 7 wkts

2007 (Official ODI): 230 (A.Kandappah 69*); Kenya 233-6 (U.Bhatti 3-19) Lost by 4 wkts
189 (T.Bastiampillai 49); Kenya 193-6 Lost by 4 wkts


(Four-Day Matches)

(Kenya won 1; Canada won 1)
HS: G.Barnett 136; BB: U.Bhatti 6-65

2006: Canada 235(Q.Ali 91) and 286 (G.Barnett 136); Kenya 231 (H.Osinde 4-51) and 265( U.Bhatti 6-65) WON by 25 runs

2007: Canada 263 (S.Dhaniram 78) and 229 (A.Kandappah 87);Kenya 393 (U.Bhatti 5-75) and 105-1 Lost by 9 wkts

Sourced from:cricketeurope.com


An early cricket tour of North America -- Posted Tuesday, October 23 2007

One of the rarest of all cricket books, The Log of the "Old Un" from Liverpool to San Francisco 1886, was "Printed for Private Circulation" at Exeter in that same year. It was reprinted in facsimile, with the addition of a preface by P. Wynne-Thomas, in 1994 in the valuable series of reprints by J. W. McKenzie of interesting but largely unobtainable cricket monographs. Due, however, to publishing delays copies have only recently become available.

Under the pseudonym of the "Old Un" lurks William Clulow Sim, who in retirement from the Indian Civil Service was the Honorary Secretary and chief benefactor of the Devonshire County Cricket Club. In 1886 he combined a visit to his son in California with one to Eastern North America in the capacity of scorer to the English Cricketing Eleven's tour that was arranged by his friend E.J. Sanders, a leading member of the Devonshire Club.

Sanders chose County and University players, of whom the best known are K.J. Key and H.W. Bainbridge (later captains of Surrey and Warwickshire respectively). His captain was W.E. Roller of Surrey, the batting hero of Sanders' similar tour of the previous year. Nine games in all were played, two in Canada and seven in the U.S.A., of which the two in Philadelphia have been assigned first-class status. The team was victorious in all its matches except for a draw in Boston against a New England XV. The match in Toronto was won by eight wickets against an Ontario Cricket XI for which F. Harley scored 40 out of only 72 in the first innings and A.C. Allan and R.B. Ferrie (who also took three wickets) 45 and 38 respectively out of 111 in the second. At Montreal the England XII (including Sanders himself) easily beat XVI of Montreal C.C. by an innings and 117 runs after scoring 257. Sim gives scores for all the matches, but omits bowling analyses and, for four matches, details of the innings of the opposition. The 20 remaining pages of his "plain, unvarnished 'Iog'", as with so many descriptions of nineteenth-century tours to North America, do not decribe the actual cricket but revel in travel arrangements and the scenery. Sim actually left the tour after the second match (at Toronto) and expatiates on his journey to California and that state's prospects for future greatness. Inevitably he discusses the American love for baseball: "Cricket", he claims, "is more likely to take root and prosper in Canadian than in American soil. It is not fast enough for the go-ahead Yankee." He particularly notes the dangers to a baseball umpire: "If one meets a man in the street with his arm in a sling, one broken leg, and an eye out, it may safely be conjectured that this 'wreck of humanity' had been 'adjudicating' at some recent big base ball match, and had to run the gauntlet of some two or three thousand infuriated lookerson."

Wynne- Thomas writes a sober account (in contrast to Sim's pun-Iaden prose) of the history of earlier cricketing tours, briefly describes the one of 1886 (making the interesting point that many of the U.S. teams, but neither of the Canadian, were strengthened by visiting English professionals) and gives brief biographies of the members of the party, with a strange emphasis upon their deaths (but omits to say that Sir Kingsmill Key died of an insect bite and completely omits Hugh Rotherham, the Warwickshire all-rounder and well-known rugby football threequarter for Coventry who died in 1939). Some explanatory notes would have been useful. Many readers may not realize that the "Tristie" to whom Sim refers is the Somerset wicket-keeper F .T. Welman; and who is Handford (no initials given) who played for the English team at Boston ? Could this be the U.S. player Saunders Handford, brother of the Nottinghamshire professional Alick Handford, who was drafted into the team because of the injury or indisposition of Roller and Rotherham ?

Wynne- Thomas quotes the notoriously misguided prophecy from the New York Commercial Advertiser that "It is believed by some Americans that cricket will very soon supersede the game of baseball, especially as a gentleman's game. It is conducted in a quiet manner and without the usual howling that marks the game of baseball." But he concludes with the provocative observation that if cricket had forged ahead in popularity in the U.S.A. Sanders' two matches in Philadelphia may have been regarded to-day as Test Matches, since they were of a higher standard than those in 1888/89 between Major Warton's English team, captained by "Round-the- Corner" Smith, and the South Africans that were subsequently granted that status.

William Clulow Sim, The Log of the "Old Un" from Liverpool to San Francisco 1886 (with an introduction by Peter Wynne- Thomas, 16 + 30 pages) is available from J.W. McKenzie, 12 Stoneleigh Park Road, Ewell, Epsom, Surrey, KT19 OQT, England at 15 pounds sterling

AR Littlewood
University of Western Ontario


17th Century cricket -- Posted Tuesday, October 23 2007

THE SEVENTEENTH CENTURY GAME OF CRICKET: A RECONSTRUCTION OF THE GAME

The novelty of this paper is that, for the first time, cricket has been analysed in the context of its early seventeenth century geographical locations. Furthermore, connections have been established between cricket and the sixteenth and seventeenth century trade routes in Kent, Surrey and Sussex. The language of cricket in the seventeenth century has been reconstructed, throwing light upon how the game was played at that time and advancing our knowledge of the game. The idea of the Flemish being involved with cricket gained credence recently when, first, John Eddows pointed out that John Derrick, had a Flemish surname and gave evidence in a court case at Guildford that he had played cricket there about 1550; and, second, Heiner Gillmeister put forward a theory that the Flemish name for hockey was probably contracted to krik-ket.(1)

The seventeenth century game of cricket was firmly rooted in the counties of Kent, Surrey and Sussex, but similar bat and ball games were played in other parts of the country. These included Cat and Dog in lowland Scotland, Bandy Wicket in East Anglia, Stool Ball and Bat and Trap throughout England, (2) Tut in Cornwall and Devon (3) and Stow-Ball and Stob-Ball in the counties of Gloucestershire, Wiltshire, north Somerset and parts of Dorset.(4) All of these games appear to have been originally single wicket or double-base games with the scoring of points.

Stow and stob are dialect names for a stump, being the lower part of a tree or its remaining stump, (5) so we can guess that this was the original wicket. A stow was also a frame used in mining to support `crawling tunnels', perhaps used in the north Somerset lead mines. For the seventeenth century we know as much about stow-ball as we do of cricket. John Aubrey, ( The Sports Historian, No. 20, 1 (May, 2000), pp. 33-43), recounts his knowledge of stow-ball in north Wiltshire in the period 1648-1686. The withy or willow staves were carefully shaped by their owners, or the local stave maker, and each son when he reached the age of eight was given two staves by his father. The ball was four inches in diameter with a sole leather case stuffed hard with boiled quills. The farm labourers used to hurry home from the fields to gather for a game in the evening, showing us that a cricket-like game was more compulsive than it is today.(6) A game of stow-ball was played on Bullingdon Green, Oxford in 1667 on an area of three acres.(7) This is much the same size as today's cricket ground.

Many stow-ball games were played on chalk, particularly in Wiltshire, Dorset and north Somerset, and chalk was the preferred sub-soil. It drains well, and, being used predominately for grazing sheep, the grass is kept short. Flat chalkland is an excellent surface as it is usually drier than other surfaces, which is important when balls are absorbent and thus become wet and heavy. The ball on chalk can be hit some distance and can produce a lively game as the ball bounces across the grass.

The bat itself did not have to be heavy like those 4 pound weapons of the late eighteenth century. They were light in weight and shaped somewhat like a hockey stick.(8) An Englishman visiting Ireland in 1673 refers to the common people as playing bandy (hurling) with balls and crooked sticks much after our play at stow-ball. (9) In fact we can get an idea of these bats by looking at some examples. Around 1700 they are like hockey-sticks, shaped with flat surfaces, and the batsman is usually called a striker. He stood with knees bent and used a downward sweep to hit the ball. The objective was to loft the ball over the heads of the fielders, known as catchers and seekers. Balls were hit to either side of the bowler, (10) further emphasising that a hockey-type stick was used. This picture gives us a glimpse of the `play of the game' with strategically placed catchers and seekers who appear as long stops. The toss of a coin determined which team would choose the pitch, and or, the team to bat first. (11) It was honorable in got-up games for the captains or best players to pick teams of equal strength from those available.(12)

In the late seventeenth century, the ball was trundled, not bowled as we know today, in overs of four balls. Does the number four represent the number of stumps used in a game? The lucky number three would have been a more logical choice as it was used in a number of other sports. It is doubtful if the ball was ever rolled along the ground as the contemporary word `trundle' describes, but tossed low aiming at one of the two stumps as the ground was seldom level. It was likely that bowlers both trundled the ball, as would children be taught, and skimmed it above the ground when they became more skilled. Some early bats appear to be shaped to block the grass-cutting bowler.(13) The ball itself came in various sizes and colours around 17001(4) and was waterproofed with grease to avoid picking up moisture.(15) There was the ritual of choosing the ball at important matches (16) and we can probably look at the limits of the ball being between three and four inches in diameter. (17)

The heavy modern-type ball with wound core and thick leather cover did not come into use much before 1760 when Richard Duke of Penshurst, Kent was making first class balls between 1748 and 1762. (18) He is credited with inventing the modern ball. There is mention of a crimson ball in 1753 and this may be a reference to one of Duke's balls.19 Certainly in 1727 the covers were flying off balls during play.20 These balls were probably of blackthorne wood and covered in leather. We hear of Thomas Ken playing a bat and ball game at Winchester College around the middle of the seventeenth century `with the bats ringing' from the impact of the ball, and again balls ringing in a game at the end of the century. (21) Flat-faced bats are more likely to produce a ringing sound than circular cross-section bats and with the combination of a leather covered wooden ball would give rise to ringing or vibrating of bats and the stinging of the hands.

The term `bat' is comparatively rare before 1720. The older terms are `staff', `stave', or `stick', which tended to be used regionally: for example, `stave' was used in the Gloucester area, and `bat' in the south-east, while `staff' and especally `stick' were more widely used. `Bat' is derived from the French battledore, shaped like a table tennis bat, which were used by washer women to beat their washing with. (22) The use of the `bat' in cricket is peculiar to Kent and Sussex and their coastal smugglers were known as batmen, because of the cudgels they carried. We first hear of the `flat-faced' bat in 1622. (23)

Prior to the late 1770s the wicket comprised of two stumps with a bail, with the height of the stumps being high and the width between them being narrow.24 Earlier eighteenth century pictures show a wicket that was wider than it was higher, perhaps two feet wide by one foot high which was the case in America in 1720. The ends of the stumps were forked to support the light bail, and there were criteria for the firmness of pitching the stumps into the ground and for the delicate placing of the bail so that it would easily topple when the stump was hit.

Bowlers were reported to deliver very fast and accurate with the light ball they used, but the batsman had the problem of defending two stumps, about two feet apart. Hence the shape and size of bat could be important. A 1742 wood-cut shows a home-made bat designed more in the shape of an ice-hockey stick, for better defence of the wicket. (25) There has been a lot of conjecture about the origin of the wicket, but suffice to say that the seventeenth century outline shape is more akin to the profile of a church stool, which is low and long. (26)

The term `umpire' is first noted in 1680. (27) They were grey-haired veterans who were rich in cricket lore. (28) The function of the umpire's bat was for the batsman to touch with his own to record a run. (29) As far as we know there were three methods of getting a batsman out: by bowling him out, catching him out, and hitting the wicket with the ball before he had touched the umpire's bat. (30) The double wicket game was controlled by two umpires, one from each team, who would position their bats, before allowing the bowler to bowl. Each team was usually responsible for providing one umpire and presumably both umpires had to agree on the decisions taken. (31) The holding of a bat represents the staff of office which certainly goes back to the fifteenth century in some sports. (32) In cudgeling, the umpire was called a `stickler', and his stick was used to separate the cudgelers, as also in wrestling. (33) The word `stickler' does have the connotation of law and order and may have been the name used in cricket in the early seventeenth century.

Around 1700 there were two trustworthy scorers, seated on the grass or upon stools. The scorers knotched the score on a stick, with a deeper knick at 20, which of course represented a score. (34) This method of counting was much used by shepherds when counting sheep, hence the connection between cricket being played on sheep-shorn hills and the method of scoring for cricket. From the fifteenth century into the seventeenth, the term `point' or `prick' appears to be popular as a means of keeping a tally, this terminology being derived from scoring with a point or prick of the pen upon paper or wood. (35)

In the early seventeenth century the known areas of play can be broadly described as the area of Sevenoaks and Maidstone in Kent, the Guildford area in Surrey, and Chichester in Sussex. (36) These areas are located around the perimeter of the Weald. They also represent seventeenth century trade routes. The game can be traced along the road from London to Rye in Kent with a spur to Maidstone, the Guildford to Chichester road, and along the river Wey from Farnham to Weybridge. There are several hills named `cricket hill' along the route of the river Wey. The one at Weybridge is recorded in the late sixteenth century in local manorial court records, while others are in the parishes of Bramley, Send, and Seale, all places where early cricket was played. (37) While the word `cricket' can be interpreted as `crooked hill', it is unusual to find a cluster of four hills so named in such a small area.

The Flemings were active in the cloth trade in all the areas where cricket was played during the seventeenth century. It is interesting to find that one John Derrick, a Flemish name, in 1598, claimed to have played the game of `creckett' in Guildford about 1550. (38) This clue connects the Flemings with cricket. Some Flemings had been in Kent from as early as 1328, but we know they were well established in the south east by the end of the fifteenth century, where they largely controlled the cloth trade. The religious disturbances in western Europe saw some 5,000 Flemish and French Protestant refugees land at Sandwich and make their way to Canterbury in 1566, and as many again in other years entered Kent, Surrey, and Sussex. These immigrants were eventually absorbed into the hinterland, and many probably joined their countrymen in the clothing trade, brewing or glassmaking. (39)

With the Flemish came their language and perhaps their sport. No evidence has been found of playing a game of cricket in Flanders, but they did play a hockey game which appears to have been known as `met de krik ketsen', meaning `with the stick chase', which gives rise to Gillmeister's theiry that the `krik ketsen' were foreshortened to `cricket'. (40) Interestingly, the church stool was known by the Flemish name of `cricket' in 1656 in Sussex and 1623 outside the south-east. (41) The profile of the stool is very similar to that of the wicket used in the seventeenth century. Some of the earlier eighteenth century pictures suggest a wicket of about one foot high by two feet wide. Furthermore, the legs of the stool were called stumps, which adds further credence to the idea that the earliest wicket was a stool. (42) Did the Flemish adapt stoolball and call it cricket? In the games of stow-ball, stob-ball and stool-ball, the name of the game is derived from the target at which the ball is bowled. So why not the same derivation for the game of cricket? The alternative is that `cricket' derived from the hitting implement, that is the Anglo-Saxon name `crick' with the French-Norman diminutive `et' Another anomaly is the use of the plural `creckets' or `crickets' for the game. In the early seventeenth century, both single and double wicket games were popular, and the plural form of cricket identified the double wicket game. At later periods it was the single wicket game that needed identification. The introduction of the double wicket games supposes that number playing was larger than normal.

There is another view that the word `wicket', which was first recorded in cricket in 1680, (43) comes from playing the game against a small wicket gate, but wicket gates are associated with property: this relegates such a game to one played by children outside their houses, not by adults as a folk game played on the village green or in a field. There is a stob-ball field mentioned in Oxfordshire as early as 1525, (44) which demonstrates that bat and ball games were played in a designated field. The word `wicket' has a counterpart in Flanders called `wechet'. (45) Interestingly, the south-east English dialect would have called a wicket a `wecket' and cricket `crecket'.

By 1629 the game had attracted the attention of the lesser gentry. At Rucking in Kent, the curate was found playing Cricketts after evening prayer: in his defence, he said he was not playing with mean and base persons but with persons of repute and of fashion. (46) There are social reasons why cricket would have expanded in the second half of the sixteenth century. It was a time when parishioners began to pay poor rates instead of holding church ales to raise money. Church ales were largely activities within each parish. With the demise of church ales, the rise of inter-village sport came about, and we hear of competitions, one village against another, from the 1590 period, at football, dancing. cudgeling and wrestling. (47) About 1610, in the Kent parish of Chevening, there was a Cricketting between the Weald and Upland, which suggests that the best players of two localities met in a grand match. (48)

The Puritans had been pleased to see the decline the church ales and the rowdiness they provoked. By the 1620s the new puritanical laws began to hinder the traditional Sunday sport which depressed the game's development. There is evidence of suppression at Maidstone before 1635. Between 1643 and 1660 the law forbade sport on Sundays, (49) but this did not always stop cricket being played, as we hear of a game in Eltham in 1654 50 and one of stow-ball in Westminster in 1658. (51) Cricket was now expanding outside its traditional area.

To conclude, the cloth-working fringe area of the Weald area was poorly populated in the fifteenth century, with villages being small. Flemish migration appears to have increased, particularly in the middle years of the sixteenth century. The Flemish probably molded the traditional game of stoolball into something we recognise as cricket. Population growth in the area in the sixteenth century would have soon demanded a double-wicket game with the deployment of a greater number of players. However, there is much we need to know about Flemish bat and ball games in the sixteenth century before we can reach a conclusion on their involvement in cricket.

Children, perhaps mostly Flemish, were the prominent players of the game during the sixteenth century. From the 1580s, circumstances were ripe for the game to be played by adults, and there are hints to the frequency of cricket being mentioned. Only by about 1610 is it clear the game was in full-swing in three distinct areas, Maidstone-Sevenoaks, Guildford, and Chichester. By 1629 people of quality played the game, and by 1646 gamblers had been attracted to it. (52) The pressure of the Puritans probably inhibited the game, because after 1660 its popularity increased alongside that of other sports. This, some historians have argued, was connected to the migration of nobility and gentry into cricket areas around the Weald, and bringing the game to London and other parts of England. The name `cricket' is hardly found outside the three south-eastern counties until the final quarter of the seventeenth century.

The game I have attempted to describe is `the play of the game of cricket', during the second half of the seventeenth century. It was then evolutionary, but many elements of the game were in place before 1700. Its terminology had changed, it had ceased to be a folk game, and emerged as a national sport in the eighteenth century.

David Terry.

Published in the Journal of Sports History


Janet John-Dorie ready to lead Canada's women's cricket team -- Posted Monday, October 22 2007

In her 55 years, Janet John-Dorie has survived a brush with armed militants in Guyana, endured pneumonia and visited an estimated 50-plus countries.

She has been a Hindu nun, a teacher and a television journalist.

Now, she's simply the senior member of Canada's national women's cricket team.

John-Dorie leads the Canadians into the inaugural Americas Cup Women's Championship which kicks off Monday at the Maple Leaf Cricket Club. Canada will compete with Bermuda, Argentina and Trinidad & Tobago.

John-Dorie says the Canadians match up well, even against the tournament's overwhelming favourite.

"Trinidad & Tobago has a lot of physical expertise," she said. "But experience is very valuable in winning."
And in John-Dorie, the wicket-keeper with almost a half-century of cricket under her belt, Canada certainly has that. John-Dorie began playing professionally in the 1970s and has faced competition from countless countries around the world.

But coach Tony Cordle says she brings more to the pitch than just her experience.

"She's quite agile behind the wicket," Cordle said. "She looks remarkably fit and ready to go. You'd think that someone is a year older and maybe looking to retire, but she's as fit and keen as ever about this thing.

"She's a great personality to have on the team. Every one of the girls on the team loves her."

Still, her expertise is appreciated - particularly as the wicket-keeper.

"It is a specialist position," Cordle said. "You need tremendous concentration."

That sense has been honed over the years. Despite the diversity of John-Dorie's pursuits in life, cricket was never far from the fore.

She began playing as a six-year-old in Guyana. Her father was a sugar-cane cutter and her mother was a vendor, and money was too scarce for her family to buy the proper gear she needed to play.

So she improvised. John-Dorie and her brothers fashioned makeshift cricket bats out of branches from coconut trees and bowled with condensed milk cups.

That ingenuity also served her well in her journalism career.

She worked on two shows in Guyana during her 11-year TV career - "Look, Listen and Change" and "Health Run."
She interviewed doctors, presidents and athletes and investigated health and political issues, all the while doing her own camera work. She went to dozens of countries to do her work, spending much of her time trying to shed light on medical issues and injustices, while also making sure to take in as many cricket matches as she could.

"I see travelling like a walk-in university," she said. "You can't learn about people at a university. You have to go and see them, be involved in them, learn and come back and give the real experience."

It was her work as an activist journalist that led her to Canada.

She was covering a protest from the opposition party in 2002 when militants herded her into a minibus with another journalist. They pointed a gun at her and took her camera away.

"They said they would kill me if I took the news to my television station," John-Dorie said. "I jumped into my car and I just rushed. I didn't know where I was driving, but I drove, drove, drove."

She had seen enough of a volatile political situation she said was worsening. She came to Canada soon afterwards, where she represented herself in immigration court and earned landed immigrant status.

Since then, she's dedicated herself to growing a game she loves in a country without much cricket history, and to raising the profile of Canadian cricket abroad.

"I will try to put in every drop to see that the flag of Canada flying high," she said.

John-Dorie credits her religion with allowing her to play cricket well into middle age.

She was raised in a strict Hindu household. As an adult, she spent 14 years as a Hindu nun, teaching at the Brahma Kumaris World Spiritual University and various other schools.

Still deeply religious, John-Dorie meditates daily and keeps vegetarian. Her meditation, she says, gives her the strength to continue playing.

Through it all, John-Dorie has lived a mostly solitary life. She has never married and has no children.

"Sports carries a balance in my life," she said. "I never had interest in getting a family ... let me look after the books and the cricket, and channel my energy into that direction, and I will make it."

John-Dorie says she feels healthy. She suffered a bout of pneumonia when she first arrived in Canada as she struggled to adjust to the cold. But once again, she soldiered through.

So how long will she continue playing cricket?
"I still see myself as fit to keep on playing," she said.
"(Someone) asked me about retirement earlier, and I said it never dawned upon me, because I think of myself as 16 years old."

Report sourced from:-
http://ca.news.yahoo.com/s/capress/070819/sports/crkt55_year_old_1

Readers should note that the "Ontario Ladies Cricket Club: OLCC" has developed a Constitution and By-Law's as of September 23, 2007. (JH)


Gentlemen of England, 1872 -- Posted Sunday, October 21 2007

Équipe de cricket des Gentlemen of England, photographie composite, Montréal, QC, 1872

William Notman (1826-1891)
1872, 19e siècle
Plaque de verre au collodion humide
20 x 25 cm
Achat de l'Associated Screen News Ltd.
I-77162


Use the link to see the image. (JH)

http://www.musee-mccord.qc.ca/fr/collection/artefacts/I-77162§ion=196


2nd ODI: Kenya cruise to victory -- Posted Saturday, October 20 2007
Canada won the toss and chose to bat in the second one-day international in Nairobi. A 42 run opening partnership between Abdul Jabbar and Mohammad Iqbal got them off to a good start. After the openers fell, Mulla failed again, but Kandappah (28) and Bastiampillai (49) put on 63. Bhatti (22) hit briefly but was bowled trying for his third consecutive six, and the tail crumbled, Canada all out 189 in 47.1 overs. Obanda top-scored with 85. Canada now travel onto Namibia.

Canada took a couple of early wickets but the total was never challenging as Kenya passed the Canadian total with 4 wickets and 7 overs to spare.


Cricinfo Scorecard


Odoyo sparks Kenya past Canada -- Posted Saturday, October 20 2007

Summary score: ODI (50 over match) Kenya v Canada at Gymkhana Sports Club, Nairobi
October 18, 2007

Canada 230 all out (48.3 overs; Arvind Kandappah 69 runs not out, Abdul Jabbar 44 runs, Lameck Onyango 3 wickets for 29 runs)

Kenya 233 runs for 6 wickets (48.4 overs; Thomas Odoyo 111 runs not out, Jimmy Kamande 37 runs not out, Maurice Ouma 33 runs, Umar Bhatti 3 wickets for 19 runs)

Kenya won by 4 wickets

Kenya won the toss and batted.

Report

Nairobi/Toronto (Oct 18): Kenyan all-rounder Thomas Odoyo stroked his way to an initial ODI century and guided his side to victory against Canada in Nairobi on Thursday. Canada had scored 230 runs all out in 48.3 overs, then seemed on top as Umar Bhatti took 3 wickets in a tight spell of bowling that left Kenya teetering at 49 runs for 5 wickets. Bhatti bowled his ten overs consecutively, ending with 3 wickets for just 19 runs.

Odoyo lead the recovery, first with 19-year old batsman Alex Obanda, then with fellow veteran all-rounder Jimmy Kamande. The Odoyo-Obanda partnership added 86 runs before Obanda was out for 30 runs, on his ODI debut. Odoyo and Kamande then carried Kenya to a much sought victory with a stand of 98 runs in 13.1 overs. Kenya won with 8 balls to spare. Kamande finished on 37 runs not out. Odoyo's match winning straight-drive took him to 111 runs not out. His score was made off 113 balls and included 11 boundaries.

Odoyo had scored his initial first-class century last week in the ICC Intercontinental Cup match between these two teams. An innings that had setup the subsequent win for Kenya. He was named the first ICC Associate ODI Player of the Year recently and clearly lived up to this billing so far during Canada's African tour.

Canada's innings was based around opening batsman Abdul Jabbar's knock of 44 runs and Arvind Kandappah's 69 runs not out. Four other batsmen, two in the upper order, made scores in the 20's but were unable,om the day, to convert such starts into a big score. There were two partnerships of 52 runs, one between Jabbar and Asif Mulla for the 3rd wicket, the other involved Kandappah and Jason Patraj.

Lameck Onyango was the most successful bowler for Kenya with 3 wickets for 29 runs. Spinners Steve Tikolo and Kamande each bowled ten overs for about 30 runs, a reasonable economy rate.

The teams meet again in the second and final ODI of this tour on Saturday in Nairobi. Canada then moves on to Windhoek to face Namibia in an ICC Intercontinental Cup match. Kenya face Bermuda in three ODI matches and in the Intercontinental Cup.

Eddie Norfolk


United States of America v Canada -- Posted Saturday, October 20 2007

United States of America v Canada,
First ever match
St George's Cricket Club Ground, Manhattan, New York
24,25 September 1844

Result: Canada won by 23 runs
Toss: United States of America
Umpires: H Russel and Walker

Canada 1st innings

D Winckworth run out 12
J Wilson b Wright 0
Birch c Bage 5
GA Barber b Wright 1
Sharpe b Wright 12
GA Phillpotts lbw b Groom 1
JB Robinson lbw 1
HJ Maddock not out 7
Freeling c Dudson 12
French b Groom 9
Thompson b Wright 5

Extras (b 11, w 6) 17
Total (all out) 82


United States of America 1st innings
J Turner b Winckworth 7
G Wheathcroft b Winckworth 9
J Ticknor lbw 0
J Symes c Thompson 1
H Groom c Thompson 0
R Bage not out 1
R Ticknor b Thompson 5
S Wright c Barber 4
RN Tinson st Philpotts 14
S Dudson c Freeling 4
Wild b Winckworth 10

Extras (b 7, w 2) 9
Total (all out) 64

Canada 2nd innings
D Winckworth b Wright 14
J Wilson b Groom 0
Birch c Turner 0
GA Barber b Groom 3
Sharpe b Groom 5
GA Phillpotts b Wright 13
JB Robinson b Wright 4
HJ Maddock b Groom 7
Freeling not out 7
French b Wright 0
Thompson lbw 3

Extras (w 7) 7
Total (all out) 63


United States of America 2nd innings

J Turner c Barber b Sharpe 14
J Ticknor b Sharpe 0
J Symes b Sharpe 11
H Groom b Winckworth 0
R Bage not out 5
R Ticknor b Sharpe 8
S Wright b French 3
RN Tinson lbw b Sharpe 0
S Dudson c Winckworth b Sharpe 0
Wild c Maddock 8
G Wheathcroft absent -

Extras b 3, w 6) 9
Total all out 58

Wheatcroft 'failed to arrive in time' to bat in the 2nd innings.

Information sourced from:-
http://www.cricinfo.com/db/ARCHIVE/1840S/1844/OTHERS/USA_CAN_24-25SEP1844.html


Kenya v Canada, 1st ODI, Nairobi -- Posted Friday, October 19 2007

Kenya 233 for 6 (Odoyo 111*, Bhatti 3-19) beat Canada 230 (Kandappah 69*, Onyango 3-29) by four wickets


Thomas Odoyo's maiden ODI century led a remarkable Kenya fightback in the opening match of their short series against Canada in Nairobi. He came in with the home side in tatters at 49 for 5 chasing 231, but calmly set about a recovery before taking the game away from Canada with a flurry of boundaries alongside a composed Jimmy Kamande who helped add a match-winning stand of 98 in 13 overs.
Odoyo, who opened his first-class century count against Bermuda last week, was again in commanding form and highlighted his importance to Kenya and also his standing among Associate players. Kenya were falling apart when he arrived in the 11th over, but he was quickly into his stride. Any half volley that came along was emphatically dispatched through the covers, while short balls didn't cause any problems. As the requirement was reduced to double figures he began using his feet to the spinners and finished the chase in fine style with a straight drive off Sunil Dhaniram. The paltry crowd of a hundred or so spectators grew as Odoyo expanded his shots and a large group of schoolchildren arrived to cheer him on.

But Odoyo wouldn't have succeeded without support from his team-mates, in particular Alex Obanda, the nineteen-year-old. Obanda might have missed out had Tanmay Mishra been picked, but Mishra didn't attend training and, to compound the confusion, he is preparing to go to university in India. They didn't miss him today, however, with Obanda repairing the initial damage with 30 in a stand of 86. Kamande, who earlier bowled an economical spell of offspin, then showed his batting skills with a 31-ball 37.
The result was hard luck on Umar Bhatti, the left-arm opening bowler, who had produced an outstanding spell, bowling his 10 overs straight through for three wickets. He had David Obuya caught at mid-off, removed Nehemiah Odhiambo with a first-ball edge to the wicketkeeper and accounted for Steve Tikolo for a duck in similar style.
Canada had wasted a promising position with the bat after racing to 89 for 2 in the 13th over. They slipped to 131 for 6 as Kamande and Tikolo conceded 62 in 20 overs between them. But 36-year-old Arvind Kandappah, making his ODI debut, ensured against a complete collapse. He added 52 with Jason Patraj (20) then Umar Bhatti contributed a 17-ball 22.

Kandappah reached fifty off 73 balls and hit three sixes, but Canada couldn't bat out their 50 overs. Patraj was taken at extra cover and Bhatti heaved to mid-on, although they had at least given their side something to bowl at. For a while it looked like enough, but then Odoyo made his presence felt.

Report sourced from:-

http://content-www.cricinfo.com/kenyavcan/content/story/316023.html



Newly appointed CEO outlines ambitious plans -- Posted Thursday, October 18 2007

Canada to take inspiration from ice hockey

Canada's recently appointed chief executive, Atul Ahuja, will be taking inspiration from his country's high profile sports such as ice hockey in a bid to increase the level of professionalism of cricket.

Ahuja, an Indian-born Canadian citizen with extensive business experience, takes up the role on November 1 and is confident that the shorter format of the game, in particular Twenty20, will prove popular in Canada.

"Cricket holds a huge potential in Canada that needs to be tapped," he told The Economic Times in India. "Typically, for the North American demographics the five-day test match version of the game is somewhat boring. Canada and the US are largely non-cricket playing nations and the psyche of sports lovers is not attuned to a game that goes on for five days.

"But the new shorter Twenty20 format has changed all that. We saw a huge interest in the Twenty20 matches in Canada - and the excitement created by the fireworks and cheerleaders was not just restricted to South Asians in Canada."

And the high level of professionalism in Canada's mainstream sports, such as ice hockey and football, can and should have a beneficial impact on the future of cricket in the country.

"We at the association would like to see professional contracts being drawn up for cricketers in Canada and various events at the provincial level as well," he said. "The league events for games such as baseball and football are a big draw and the same could be done for cricket.

"It's a power-packed format of the game [Twenty20] and we have some events lined up in this format in Canada in the coming months.

"In India, only the top 20-30 cricketers earn good money. We intend to change that and want to take the game to most of our provinces and colleges and universities."


Article sourced from:-
http://content-www.cricinfo.com/canada/content/story/315963.html


A Canadian cricket record -- Posted Thursday, October 18 2007

Ottawa Valley Cricket Council
Patron: Her Excellency the Governor General

The Ottawa Valley Cricket Council (OVCC) held the semi-finals and the final of its inaugural 20/20 Championship on Sunday October 7th, 2007 at the Rideau Hall cricket grounds.

In the semi-final game between Defence Cricket Club (DCC) and New Edinburgh Cricket Club (NECC), a Canadian cricket record was created.

Karandeep Singh, (affectionately known as Karan) of DCC, hit six 6's in an over. As a matter of fact he hit 10 sixes, a four and a single in 12 consecutive balls, which probably is another record.

Below is the sequence of events:-

NECC won the toss and sent DCC to bat first.

DCC were struggling at 77 for 4 in 14 overs when the young lad from New Delhi took matters in his own hand.

Karan was facing the start of the 15th over. He hit the first four consecutive balls for 6's with a four and a single for a total of 29 runs in the over, thus just missing an OVCC record of 30 runs in an over.

As a result of the single on the last ball in the previous over, Karan was facing the 16th over. The first ball of the over was a wide, with the next six consecutive deliveries going for six massive hits over the boundary ropes. The over read as: wide, 6,6,6,6,6,6. This was a unique feat that was accomplished by this young all rounder. It is a feat that has not been accomplished in Canadian cricket before and we may not see it happen again anytime soon.

Along with many others, I was one of the privileged one's to witness this historic knock in Canadian cricket history.

Gulwant S. Bajwa,
President,
Ottawa Valley Cricket Council


Some facts about selection -- Posted Wednesday, October 17 2007
For those whose favourite pastime is to hurl abuse at Canada’s national selectors “ignorance is indeed bliss”. They will never allow facts to get in the way of a good rant.

However, for any others who may be interested in the facts, the following bears repeating:-

Canada has five national selectors distributed across the country because of its vast size; the selection process is democratic; each selector has a vote and players are chosen by majority vote; any selector can propose any name for selection from anywhere; players are selected strictly on MERIT without discrimination on the basis of race, religion, national/ethnic origin, age, place of residence, provincial or club affiliation. Hence recent Canadian teams have included all the ethnic/racial/age groups playing the game regardless of where they happen to live or which team they play for.

Players are not selected on statistics alone. Among the many criteria considered by selectors are:- behaviour/attitude/discipline; fitness; past international performance (if any); current form and consistency; skill/technique/versatility (batting, bowling, fielding); experience; judgment/temperament (particularly in big, pressure games); team spirit/chemistry; team balance (openers/batsmen/allrounders/spin and pace bowlers); the type and strength of opponents; type of match (4 or one day); climatic/pitch conditions. This list is not exhaustive. Different selectors may attach different weight to any of the above considerations.

In addition, selectors are constrained by the availability of players, infrequency of national trials and special complicated ICC eligibility rules governing nationals/ “deemed nationals”. The five-man national selection committee, with input from the coach, is responsible for submitting a squad to the CCA Executive. That’s where its responsibility ends. Final game day X1 selection, which often has an important bearing on the game’s outcome, rests with the team management (coach, captain, vice captain.)

There probably has never been a team selected that satisfies everyone. However, despite the constant criticism over the years, it should be noted that Canadian teams selected since 2000 have achieved the following: reached the finals in two out of three Intercontinental Cup (four-day) tournaments; qualified at ICC Trophy (2001, 2005) for two consecutive World Cups (onedayers). When the two versions of the game are combined and considered, this is a better record than Kenya, Ireland, Scotland or Netherlands, our main rivals among Associate members of the ICC, none of whom have as good a record as Canada in both versions of the game combined, over the past seven years. The proof of the pudding is in the eating.

Canada is now in the process of sifting ALL the available talent (based on the above-noted criteria) to ensure that we have the best team available for the next World Cup qualifying tournament in Dubai in March 2009 and thus maintain our ICC High Performance status/funding and World Cup record.

Are these facts likely to have any effect on the time-honoured game of Selector-Bashing by anonymous armchair “experts” looking out for the interests of “their” player from “their” club/province? Not likely. So let the game continue.

Errol Townshend (Member CCA Senior Selection Committee)


Ontario university champions looking to get legit -- Posted Wednesday, October 17 2007


Ontario university champions looking to get legit as an official team

There are 605 members in the Ryerson Student Cricket Association, making it the second largest group on campus.

Its best players were undefeated in last summer’s Provincial Inter-University Championship when they went up against 10 other Ontario teams.

But you won’t find the trophy they won anywhere on campus.

And even the head of the sports department didn’t know of the team’s existence. That’s because there’s no official cricket league in Canadian university sports, and Ryerson’s cricketers aren’t recognized as a club.

“I didn’t know we had a cricket team,” said Jean Kennedy, director of sports and recreation. “I know other schools don’t have teams yet and you need to have enough teams to make it work.”

Abhimanyu Sharma, a recently graduated information technology student, has tried to make it work at Ryerson for years. And he won’t be quitting anytime soon. As the National Chair of the Canadian Cricket Association, Sharma has spent his entire university career organizing cricket not only at Ryerson but for universities and colleges across Canada.

The provincial tournament in July – which included teams from Western, McMaster and Brock – was the result of his efforts. It had a budget of over $25,000. Sharma hopes this recent success will finally put cricket on the map at Ryerson.

“It’s about Ryerson, because I want them to recognize our efforts,” he said. “Ryerson needs to be proud of having this cricket team.”

Ryerson went 7-0 for the tournament and defeated McMaster in the final.

“There were some really good schools there, but we really gelled,” he said. “All the students playing for different teams at Ryerson came together.”

The cricket club includes six to eight intramural teams at Ryerson that play in the gym on Mondays from 12 to 2 p.m. and Fridays from 2 to 4 p.m. The “official” cricket team, which participated in the tournament, practises separately.

Though the university has yet to recognize it, Ryerson’s cricket club is recognized by the Canadian Cricket Association and the International Cricket Council.

While Kennedy was surprised to learn about the cricket team, she added that Ryerson isn’t opposed to a team, and would be open to talking about it.

“The first step is for them to join (the department) as a sports club,” she said. “It’s a new sport to Canada, and we should be looking at it with the number of people interested.”

Kennedy pointed out that money has been spent on cricket at Ryerson, including a $6,000 cricket mat and several hundred dollars for bats.

Sharma said David Dubois, the former director of sports and recreation, was an avid supporter of his cause.

He thinks the departmental shakeup, when Dubois was released last spring, erased much of the progress that had been made.

“He was sincere in our initiative and wanted to help us,” Sharma said.

But the issue extends far beyond Ryerson’s borders. It is only one of many Ontario universities seeking legitimacy for its cricket program.
Mudebbir Ahmed, president of the cricket association at Seneca College, says he has over 80 members. Seneca was one of the 10 teams that participated in the provincial championship.

“The tournament in the summer has come a long way,” he said. “It was very positive for the league.”

Ahmed credits Sharma for how far university cricket has come in the past year.

“He is the kind of person that will make cricket more recognized,” Ahmed said. “He’s worked very hard for this. It will happen eventually. It just needs time.”

Sharma agrees, but said he feels like he’s been waiting long enough.

“We need more people to come on board to make this a reality,” he said.” The more you keep going ahead in the process, without actually getting anywhere, you start to worry it’s just not going to happen.”


Article sourced from:-
http://www.ryersonline.ca/articles/1784/1/Cricket-making-noise-at-Ryerson-/Page1.html


Kenya coach delighted with win versus Canada -- Posted Tuesday, October 16 2007

Kenya coach delighted with win and performance in difficult ICC Intercontinental Cup victory over Canada

Kenya's interim coach Alfred Boi Njuguna has hailed his team's performance in a difficult ICC Intercontinental Cup match against Canada and has urged his boys to maintain the same standards in the upcoming matches.

Kenya put behind it the let-down of two sub-standard displays at September's ICC World Twenty20 by brushing aside Canada by nine wickets in Nairobi inside three days to collect a maximum 20 points in its tournament opener.

And reflecting on the success, Njuguna said: "It was an important game for the team for more than one reason and I am delighted that it shrugged aside everything to put up a performance which can make any coach proud. While we were keen to put up a good performance in the longer version of the game, it was a difficult match for the team as it went without the influential figure of Roger Harper whose presence was always felt in the dressing room. Also, we were determined to avenge for last year's 25-run defeat against Canada in Canada and I am glad that the boys came good to show that they were mentally tough besides begin highly talented, Njuguna said.

After Canada won the toss and elected to bat first, Kenya did well to bowl the visitors out for 263, thanks to off-spinner Jimmy Kamande's 4-56. Then Thomas Odoyo, who earlier this year was named as the ICC Associate ODI Player of the Year, led the home team's reply by stroking a maiden first-class century that steered Kenya to 393.

Canada, which went into this match after routing the United Arab Emirates (UAE) by a thumping margin of an innings and 228 runs in July, failed to break Kenya's domination in the second innings when it was bowled out for 229 with the home side's captain Steve Tikolo picking up 4-34. The rampant Kenyans then took just 20.2 overs to race to the 100-run target to conjure up a comfortable victory.

Njuguna said his team made victory appear straightforward because of solid tactics and execution. Familiar home conditions gave us an advantage but we made victory look easy because we stuck to the game plan which was to bowl as straight as possible and bat as long as possible.

It was a flat wicket and the only way we could get 20 wickets to win the match was by forcing the batsmen into mistakes by making them play. At the same time, we knew that if we succeeded in occupying the crease, the runs would come.

Njuguna was full of praise for Odoyo and 19-year-old Alex Obanda. There could not have been a better occasion for Odoyo to take the responsibility and score his maiden first-class century," he said.

"It was a quality innings that showed his promise and potential. I was also pleased with the temperament and stroke selection of Obanda. I think his innings of 83 from 70 balls was important because it gave the team momentum for a substantial first innings score. This boy has a bright future, he added.

The Kenya coach agreed that a winning start had given his team a good confidence booster and hoped his team would also succeed in pocketing another 20 points when it faces Bermuda in the familiar Nairobi Gymkhana conditions from 1 to 4 November.

We have set good standards for ourselves but to maintain that we will have to work harder," he said.

"I have reminded my boys not to get complacent or not to get carried away by the fact that Bermuda is a lowly-placed team. Our objective is to be the top Associate country and we can only achieve that by rigorous training and continuous hard work. Obviously, we will target for maximum points against Bermuda which will put us in a very good position in this tournament. All we need to do is to believe in ourselves, stick to basics and cash in on whatever opportunity that comes our way,Njuguna said.

Canada's highlights in the match were excellent half centuries by captain Sunil Dhaniram (78), 36-year-old debutant Arvind Kandappah (87) and Trevin Bastiampillai (63), a sound all-round performance by left-armer Umar Bhatti (57 and 5-75) and good bowling by spinner Qaiser Ali (4-61).

Canada faces Namibia in its fourth match of this edition of the tournament at the Wanderers Cricket Ground, Windhoek, from 25 to 28 October.

The ICC Intercontinental Cup has quickly grown in stature and profile since its inception three years ago and now ICC's premier first-class tournament is an integral part of the Associate Members cricket schedule.

Having previously been designed around a two-group, three-day format, the event has evolved into an eight-team, round-robin and truly global tournament featuring four-day cricket which gives those teams who do not play Test cricket the chance to experience the longer form of the game.

Scotland won the first ICC Intercontinental Cup in 2004, beating Canada in the final, while Ireland has been victorious in both events since then, beating Kenya in the 2005 decider and Canada earlier this year in the 2006/07 event.

The final of the ICC Intercontinental Cup 2007/08 will take place in November 2008 at a venue yet to be decided.

For full scorecards from all ICC Intercontinental Cup matches to date and information on the competition go to:

http://www.icc-cricket.com/icc/events/intercontinental/

Report sourced from ICC media release (JH)


Kenya romps to 9 wicket win over Canada -- Posted Sunday, October 14 2007
Kenya v Canada, Intercontinental Cup, Nairobi, 3rd day

Tikolo and Ouma lead Canada rout

Cricinfo staff
October 14, 2007

Kenya 393 (Odoyo 103*, Bhatti 5-75) and 105 for 1 (Ouma 71*) beat Canada 263 and 229 (Kandappah 87, Bastiampillai 63, Tikolo 4-34) by nine wickets


Kenya opened their Intercontinental Cup campaign with a commanding nine-wicket win against Canada to take maximum points with a day to spare in Nairobi. Steve Tikolo claimed four wickets to leave Kenya chasing 100 for victory and they cruised home as Maurice Ouma helped himself to an unbeaten 68-ball 71.

Canada began the day facing a first-innings deficit of 130, following Thomas Odoyo's maiden first-class century on Saturday, and were in immediate trouble as Peter Ongondo removed both openers in the first over. Their main resistance came from a third-wicket stand of 113 between Trevin Bastiampillai (63) and 36-year-old debutant Arvind Kandappah (87). As they pushed Canada into a narrow lead there was a chance Kenya could be set a challenging target, but the home side stuck to their task.

Bastiampillai became Tikolo's first wicket when he was beaten by the turn and Asif Mulla soon followed as he edged an outswinger from Nehemiah Odhiambo. Kandappah, who clubbed three sixes in his 111-ball innings, miscued a sweep to square leg as Kenya tightened their grip leaving Odoyo to help his captain clean up the tail.

Kenya began their chase with a flurry of boundaries and Ouma recovered from his first innings duck with a string of powerful blows. David Obuya fell with the target in sight, leaving Ouma to finish the match in emphatic style by launching Qaiser Ali over long-on for his second six.

Report sourced from:-

http://content-www.cricinfo.com/icccont2007/content/story/315451.html





Scoring Summary (match completed on day 3 of a scheduled 4 days): ICC Intercontinental Cup 2007-2008

Match played at Gymkhana ground, Nairobi, Kenya
- October 12-14th, 2007

Canada 263 runs all out (88.2 overs; Sunil Dhaniram 78 runs, Umar Bhatti 57 runs, Abdul Jabbar Chaudrey 49 runs, Jimmy Kamande 4 wickets for 56 runs) and 229 all out (73 overs; Arvind Kandappah 87 runs, Trevin Bastiampillai 63 runs, Sunil Dhaniram 35 runs not out; Steve Tikolo 4 wickets for 34 runs)

Kenya 393 runs all out (107.5 overs; Thomas Odoyo 103 runs not out, Alex Obanda 83 runs, David Obuya 72 runs, Collins Obyya 35 runs, Steve Tikolo 33 runs, Umar Bhatti 5 wickets for 75 runs, Qaiser Ali 4 wickets for 61 runs) and 105 runs for 1 wicket (20.2 overs; Maurice Ouma 71 runs not out. David Obuya 25 runs)

Kenya beat Canada by 9 wickets. Kenya 20 points. Canada 0 points.

Canada won the toss and elected to bat.

Report

Kenyan skipper Steve Tikolo took 4 wickets for 34 runs and opening batsman Maurice Ouma cruised to 71 runs not out as Canada was beaten in Nairobi by 9 wickets in the ICC Intercontinental Cup Match. Canada began il’s second innings badly losing two quick wickets, then lost Qaiser Ali for 18 runs with the total on just 50 runs. Trevin Bastiampillai, with 63 runs, and Arvind Kandappah, with 87 runs, added 122 runs for the third wicket. The stand ended when Tikolo bowled Bastiampillai. His 72 was made off 160 balls and included 6 boundaries.

Kandappah played some powerful shots before being caught by Jimmy Kamande off Tikolo to make the total 196 runs for 6 wickets. Only skipper Sunil Dhaniram provided much resistance as the Canadian innings came to a swift end. Thomas Odoyo took a couple of wickets and then Tikolo accounted for the last two tailenders. Canada’s score of 229 runs left Kenya needing 100 runs to win the match.

Kenyan openers Maurice Ouma and David Obuya began purposefully, adding 80 runs before Obuya was leg-before wicket to Ail for 25 runs. Ouma ended the match on the third of four scheduled days with a six off Ali. Ouma made 71 runs not out off 68 balls, including ten boundaries and two sixes. So Kenya took a maximum 20 points from this match.

The teams meet in two ODIs later this week. Canada then moves to Windhoek to play an Intercontinental Cup match with Namibia. Bermuda arrives in Nairobi next week to play three ODIs and an Intercontinental Cup match with Kenya.

Eddie Norfolk


Kenya v Canada, Intercontinental Cup, Nairobi, 2nd day -- Posted Saturday, October 13 2007


Odoyo century lifts Kenyans

Cricinfo staff
October 13, 2007
Kenya 393 (Odoyo 103*, Bhatti 5-75) lead Canada 263 by 130 runs

Scorecard
Thomas Odoyo recorded his maiden first-class century, and the 19-year-old Alex Obanda continued his fine debut season with 83, as Kenya overcame a stiff Canadian challenge led by the left-arm seamer, Umar Bhatti, to take control on the second day of their Intercontinental Cup clash in Nairobi.

Kenya's day began inauspiciously. Having lost a wicket to the very first ball of their innings on Friday evening, history repeated itself when Bhatti resumed in the morning, and Hiren Varaiya edged an outswinger to third slip for 5. At 8 for 2, Kenya were up against it, but a third-wicket stand of 122 between Obanda and David Obuya calmed the home team's nerves.

Obanda unfurled his cover-drive almost at will, striking 14 fours from just 70 balls, and was looking set for his second century when he mistimed a loft over the covers off Sunil Dhaniram. But Obuya ground onwards, finding excellent support in a 60-run stand from the captain Steve Tikolo. Eventually he fell for 72 after slogging Qaiser Ali to deep square leg, but his brother Collins took up the cudgels to carry Kenya close to first-innings parity.
Jimmy Kamande became Bhatti's second victim when he was bowled for 17, and at 307 for 7, Kenya were eyeing up a swift conclusion. Instead they were rocked onto the back foot by Odoyo, who found stirling support from the tail to lift Kenya towards the 400-mark. He struck 14 fours and a big straight six off Dhaniram, and though Bhatti cut through the tail to finish with his sixth five-wicket haul in 11 first-class matches, it was Kenya who had the upper hand.


Rerport sourced from:-

http://content-www.cricinfo.com/icccont2007/content/story/315337.html


Kamende's heroics not enough for Kenya -- Posted Saturday, October 13 2007

Clichéd it might be, but the opening day of Kenya's Intercontinental Cup tie against Canada at Nairobi Gymkhana was a see-saw affair. After a wretched middle-order collapse which left them 121 for 6, Canada recovered magnificently to close right back in the match.

That Kenya were not in complete control was thanks to a seventh-wicket stand of 99 between Sunil Dhaniram and Umar Bhatti. Neither are slouches with the bat, but with Dhaniram attacking and Bhatti more cautious, they checked the Kenyans and then staged a solid recovery.

On an overcast morning and with some dampness from overnight rain, Canada batted and made a good start, Abdul Jabbar breezily racing to 49 on his debut with some sumptuous drives in an opening stand of 68. Inexperience then got the better of him, and he perished trying to bring up his fifty by hitting offspinner Jimmy Kamnade over long-off.

What followed was a complete collapse as Kamnade took 4 for 0 in ten balls. David Obuya held two catches close in front of the bat, while Mohammad Iqbal, who had been Jabbar's subdued partner, drove tamely to mid-on. Kamande then ran out Ashif Mulla for good measure. This was all the more remarkable as Kamande was recovering from a head injury sustained when he was attacked by carjackers on Thursday night.

At the other end, Hiren Varaiya was struggling, Qaiser Ali hitting him for three fours in eight balls, but Ali then opened up once too often and snicked high to point. to leave Canada on 121 for 6. Dhaniram had already started the counter-attack, picking Kamande off through the leg side. Bhatti had moments of luck, edging Thomas Odoyo perilously close to second slip and then top-edging Alfred Luseno over the keeper, but he also played some cracking square cuts.

Kenya persevered with spin, strangling the partnership, and the pressure finally told when Dhaniram pulled Varaiya to mid-on. The slow men kept things tight - eight runs came from ten overs - but it was the return of the quicks that polished off the tail, the last three wickets falling in 14 balls.

Kenya faced a tough 25 minutes and lost Maurice Ouma to the first ball. Ouma was criticised for his performances with the bat in South Africa, and his error of judgement here will hardly have mollified the selectors. But Canada's pace attack missed a trick, opting to bombard nightwatchman Varaiya with bouncers rather than aim at his stumps. He ducked a few, took one in the ribs, and survived until the close.

The last time they were here Canada struggled to acclimatise to the conditions and took several games to find their feet. Today, they found them inside two sessions.

Report sourced from:-

http://content-www.cricinfo.com/icccont2007/content/story/315207.html


Kenya v Canada, Intercontinental Cup, Nairobi, 1st day (CricInfo report) -- Posted Friday, October 12 2007
Kamande's heroics not enough for Kenya
Cricinfo staff
October 12, 2007

Kenya 8 for 1 trail Canada 263 (Dhaniram 78, Bhatti 57, Kamande 4-56) by 255 runs

Clichéd it might be, but the opening day of Kenya's Intercontinental Cup tie against Canada at Nairobi Gymkhana was a see-saw affair. After a wretched middle-order collapse which left them 121 for 6, Canada recovered magnificently to close right back in the match.

That Kenya were not in complete control was thanks to a seventh-wicket stand of 99 between Sunil Dhaniram and Umar Bhatti. Neither are slouches with the bat, but with Dhaniram attacking and Bhatti more cautious, they checked the Kenyans and then staged a solid recovery.

On an overcast morning and with some dampness from overnight rain, Canada batted and made a good start, Abdul Jabbar breezily racing to 49 on his debut with some sumptuous drives in an opening stand of 68. Inexperience then got the better of him, and he perished trying to bring up his fifty by hitting offspinner Jimmy Kamnade over long-off.

What followed was a complete collapse as Kamnade took 4 for 0 in ten balls. David Obuya held two catches close in front of the bat, while Mohammad Iqbal, who had been Jabbar's subdued partner, drove tamely to mid-on. Kamande then ran out Ashif Mulla for good measure.

At the other end, Hiren Varaiya was struggling, Qaiser Ali hitting him for three fours in eight balls, but Ali then opened up once too often and snicked high to point. to leave Canada on 121 for 6. Dhaniram had already started the counter-attack, picking Kamande off through the leg side. Bhatti had moments of luck, edging Thomas Odoyo perilously close to second slip and then top-edging Alfred Luseno over the keeper, but he also played some cracking square cuts.

Kenya persevered with spin, strangling the partnership, and the pressure finally told when Dhaniram pulled Varaiya to mid-on. The slow men kept things tight - eight runs came from ten overs - but it was the return of the quicks that polished off the tail, the last three wickets falling in 14 balls.

Kenya faced a tough 25 minutes and lost Maurice Ouma to the first ball. Ouma was criticised for his performances with the bat in South Africa, and his error of judgement here will hardly have mollified the selectors. But Canada's pace attack missed a trick, opting to bombard nightwatchman Varaiya with bouncers rather than aim at his stumps. He ducked a few, took one in the ribs, and survived until the close.

The last time they were here Canada struggled to acclimatise to the conditions and took several games to find their feet. Today, they found them inside two sessions.


Report sourced from:-

http://content-www.cricinfo.com/icccont2007/content/story/315207.html


A Cricketing Tribute to Honest Ed Mirvish -- Posted Friday, October 12 2007


One of Toronto's most famous citizens died during the summer, a man who built up a major retail business at his trademark 'Honest Ed's' store at the corner of Bathurst Street and Bloor Street. He later became involved in theatrical productions, restoring the Royal Alexandra Theatre and building, with his son, the Princess of Wales Theatre.

Ed Mirvish died on July 11, 2007. He began in business at the age of 15, after his father died. Quite possibly cricket bats, balls and stumps have not been sold at Honest Ed's, but he was a great member of the community.

Tributes appeared throughout the media. One example,from the 'National Post' editorial remembered “the generosity he showed his fellow human beings. He was never short of kind word for others and shared his good fortune with the less fortunate in the city.” He gave away thousands of turkeys each year and hosted an annual street party to celebrate his birthday.

It seemed fitting to leave some kind of tribute for this great man. One of the mini-bats, signed by most of the Canadian Cricket World Cup squad was placed, the handle covered by a mini-Canadian flag, outside the store on the morning of his funeral.

The bat face included a note “In memory of a great Canadian who came from humble roots and never forgot them. A great innings. Shalom.”

Perhaps one day, cricket bats, balls and stumps will be part of the inventory at the store?

But for the present, five of Canada's Cricket World Cup 2007 squad are currently in Africa for matches against Kenya and Namibia: (Sunil Dhaniram, Qaiser Ali, Asif Mulla, Umar Bhatti and Henry Osinde). They have put in a lot of time and effort for the Maple Leaf cricketing cause, as have many players, but for little financial reward. Let's hope that can change but that the underlying spirit and dedication remains.

The kind of spirit that Honest Ed Mirvish clearly believed in.

Eddie Norfolk
Toronto, Ontario


Canada off to a winning start -- Posted Thursday, October 11 2007

Canada 203 beat Kenya A 193 by ten runs

Canada got their tour of Africa off to a winning start with a 10-run victory over Kenya A at Ruaraka Sports Club.

Canada were stuck in by the Kenyans and struggled throughout their innings, with none of their batsmen able to go on and make a decent score as they ended on 203.

Moses Otieno and Dominic Wesonga shared three wickets while Ashif Mulla top scored with 36.

Kenya started solidly to reach 67 for 1 but lost regular wickets and fell short.

With Canada set to meet the full Kenyan side in the Intercontinental Cup later this week, Steve Tikolo, the captain, said his side were ready. "The team is alright and we have been in intensive training for three weeks where we have worked on rectifying our mistakes," he told The Standard. "We believe we will put a good performance to lay a platform to reach the Intercontinental Cup final next year as well as prepare for the next World Cup."

Article sourced from:-
http://content-www.cricinfo.com/kenyavcan/content/story/314910.html


Canterbury Cricket Club, Ottawa -- Posted Wednesday, October 10 2007

Canterbury Cricket Club, Ottawa

2006 Season "14 Matches Played" "Wins" 11 "Losses" 3
2007 Season "17 Matches Played" "Wins" 17 "Losses" 0


Members Representing Ontario
Akber Hussain
Rochak Mehta
Vikram Arora

Current Members Representing Ottawa Valley Cricket Council
Akhtar Mufti
Pavanveer Singh Rana.

Infomamation sorced from:-
Vikram Arora, Canterbury C.C.


CODE OF CONDUCT FOR UMPIRES -- Posted Tuesday, October 9 2007
Modified from ?Cricket Umpiring and Scoring? by Tom Smith, 1989.

Players are reminded that under Law 42, it is the Team Captain who is responsible for the behaviour of a side on the field during a match. The Umpire is given no authority under the Laws to control behaviour during the match.


The office of the Umpire has responsibility and dignity. To maintain that status in the eyes of spectators and cricketers, Umpires must never say or do anything to endanger the respect given to their position. It is hard to put up with bad behaviour of players but Umpires are expected to show PATIENCE and COMPOSURE. Even in extreme cases, Umpires should not show their feelings by word or gesture. Law 42 deals with the conduct of players and when it is necessary, the Umpire must follow the procedures for reporting and action that are laid down in the Law.

From the beginning of the game, players have been ready to give respect to the Umpire. One of the oldest traditions of cricket is and must always be, THE IMMEDIATE AND UNQUALIFIED ACCEPTANCE OF THE UMPIRE?S DECISION.

Appeals may be made quietly by one player ? or they may be loud and made by the whole team. The Umpire must give each kind of appeal equal weight and deal with them in the same manner. The judgement must be made without hurry, by waiting a second or two to consider and then calmly and deliberately giving a decision.

Umpires should not offer any form of explanation for a decision, either on or off the field. But, at the close of play it may be possible to clear up a misunderstanding by drawing attention to the Law. Do not get drawn into any argument. An umpire should not discuss a decision made by their colleague. Loyalty to a colleague must be absolute.
Umpires make mistakes from time to time. NEVER, in an attempt to be fair, level out one bad decision by deliberately making another. This is CERTAIN to lead to players losing all confidence in the Umpire. The only way to deal with a mistake is to put it behind you by applying the utmost concentration to the next action in the game.

At the same time, an Umpire must not stick stubbornly to a decision that he knows is wrong and must have the strength of character to put it right. The Laws provide for mistakes to be corrected, if it is done PROMPTLY. Remember though, that problems are best avoided by a pause before a decision, followed by a firm and definite answer.

An Umpire must not hesitate to consult a colleague who is in a better position to see a POINT OF FACT. The Laws allow for consultation and an Umpire should do so if he knows that is doubt on an essential point can be resolved. After consultation, the decision will be given by the Umpire who has jurisdiction on the appeal.

Umpires must be confident that they have support for their actions. Here that support must come from the Association and from the B.C.M.C.L.

The Association expects its members to arrive 30 minutes before the start of a match; to be properly dressed, to carry out all pre-match duties as required by the Laws, and to have the necessary equipment to properly officiate the match.

If a complaint is made IN WRITING, concerning the conduct of an Umpire appointed by the Association, then the Association will investigate the mater and take appropriate action in conjunction with the governing body responsible for the match.

UMPIRES AND SCORERS

All clubs will be assigned umpiring duty allocations for the season and such allocation for each match will be shown in the Schedule. Rescheduled games and changes to allocations will be provided to club secretaries as necessary.


All clubs will provide one (1) umpire for each of their ?away? games in Seattle and Kelowna. This will not be a part of the season allocations. Seattle and Kelowna will provide a home umpire for all of their games.

At the end of each match, each umpire must ensure that his or her name and club affiliation is recorded in the scorebook of each team, as well as printed clearly on the official Statistics Report for a the game.


Umpires and scorers are encouraged to keep notes regarding games that they are assigned to officiate at. In this way, the League can refer to them for a report should information be required to settle a matter arising.
Playing Rule No.17 requires that each team supply one Umpire?s coat for the umpire to wear during a match. Appointed umpires are encouraged to wear a white coat, white shirt, dark pants and suitable footwear. No jeans, shorts or dark sunglasses, please.

Umpires will be given total support by the League in all cases. Umpires are reminded that cricket is an amateur sport. Common sense and the Code of Ethics must be foremost in all situations.

Umpires officiating at Upper and Lower Brockton will be paid $5.00 per day towards parking.


Regulations sourced from:-
http://www.bcmcl.org/index.jsp?page_id=Umpire_code

Editorial comment:
For the purposes of clarity, some editing has been undertaken (JH)


Canada set off for Africa -- Posted Monday, October 8 2007
Canada in Kenya and Namibia 2007-08

The Canadian team flew out of Toronto on Sunday night, heading for Africa where they face Kenya and Namibia.

They are due to arrive in Nairobi late on Monday and will play a warm-up match on Wednesday before the start of their four-day Intercontinental Cup tie on October 12. There are then two ODIs, again in Nairobi, before the side moves down to Namibia on October 21. Once there, they will take part in another Intercontinental Cup game.

Canadian Cricket Association (CCA) president Mr. Ben Sennik was at the airport to see off the squad, as were various relatives, friends and some other leading local cricketers, including Abdool Samad and Mohsin Mulla. Sennik is not going to Kenya.

Most of the squad play in the Toronto and District Cricket Association. Three players - Qaiser Ali, Abdul Jabbar Chaudrey and Krunalbhai Patel normally take part in the Federation Quebecoise du Cricket/Quebec Cricket Federation.

Report sourced from:-
http://www.cricinfo.com/db/NATIONAL/ICC_MEMBERS/CAN/


Profile of an Umpire -- Posted Sunday, October 7 2007

Michael Samuel Nicholas Henry

OVERVIEW OF QUALIFICATIONS

Certified Level 3 Umpire:Canadian Cricket Association.
Associate Member- Association of Cricket Umpires and Scorers, United Kingdom.

Over 30 years of officiating within the Toronto and District Cricket Association. 17 years of officiating at Premier and First Division Levels.

Attended Umpires Instructors Seminar - Manchester U.K February 2002.

Attended various seminars conducted by prominent officiating figures such as Nigel Plews, Don Oslear, Douglas Sang Hue, Johnny Gale, Ralph Gosine, Steve Bucknor, Darryl Hair and Rudi Koertzen.

Stood as an Umpire for the following matches:-
Canada versus Denmark.
Canada versus Burmuda.
Canada versus Bangladesh.
Canada versus United States.
Canada versus West Indies A -- 2 Matches.
ICC U19 Americas Cricket Championship, Toronto Canada 2003.
ICC Cricket World Cup, South Arica 2003 lead up matches. Holland vs. Western Provinces and Sri. Lanka vs. Free State.

America Cup, Buenos Aries Argentina 2002.
North American Cricket Tournament, Vancouver Canada 1997.
ICC Cricket World Cup 2003 4th Umpire, South Africa.
Sahara Cup 1997 & 1998 4th Umpire, Toronto Canada.
West Indies versus M.C.C. 3rd Umpire, Toronto Canada.
Working knowledge of Code 2000 Laws of Cricket, International Cricket Council Code of Conduct, Standard Playing Conditions and other regulations. Working experience of Duckworth/Lewis method for calculating targets in one-day cricket.

Information sourced from:-

http://tcuandsa.homestead.com/MikeHenry.html


Canadian Commonwealth League -- Posted Saturday, October 6 2007

Apollo secures Canadian Commonwealth Premier Championship


Apollo's winning Premier team
Apollo batsman (a) Harvinder Singh & (b) Irfan Rabbani,each made 50's

Georgetown batsman John Mitchell
Brampton Master's Division 1 winning team

MPP Mario Sergio presented the Premier Trophy to Apollo Captain Vijay Singh

Scoring summary: Canadian Commonwealth Cricket Association of Toronto - Premier Playoff Final

Played at Keele Reservoir, Top Pitch, Toronto on Sunday September 30, 2007

Georgetown 185 runs for 9 wickets (50 overs; Mitchel John 59 runs, Franklin Lachlan 31 runs, Deodal Gopi 4 wickets for 43 runs)

Apollo 185 for 7 wickets ( Irfan Rabbini 55 runs, Harvinder Singh 51 runs, Vijay I Singh 33 runs not out)

Apollo won by 3 wickets

Report

Apollo beat Georgetown by 3 wickets to secure the Canadian Commonwealth Cricket Association of Toronto's Premier Division championship on Sunday (Sept 30).

A century stand for the third wicket between Irfan Rabbini (55 runs) and Harvinder Singh (51 runs) provided the backbone for Apollo's innings. Georgetown then made some breakthroughs once the main stand had ended. However Vijay Singh, the Apollo captain, steered his side to victory with an innings of 33 runs not out.

Georgetown opening batsman John Mitchell scored 59 runs, but steady bowling kept the early scoring under control. John was involved in stands of 57 runs for the second wicket and 43 runs for the 3rd wicket with Franklin Lachlan, who wnet on to make 31 runs. Mitchell was the third wicket to fall, then Deodal Gopi struck with three quick wickets, including Lachlan, to change the course of the game. Apollo's bowlers ensured the later batting was unable to push the score beyond 185 runs for 9 wickets in 50 overs. Gopi ended with 4 wickets for 43 runs.

Georgetown opening bowler Alvin Singh dismissed both Apollo opening batsmen for ducks (no runs) to give his team some early momentum. But Harvinder Singh and Rabbini began to gain control.

After Harvinder Singh had been caught at long-off, driving Mitchell, Alan Mohammed took 3 wickets, including that of Rabbini, to give Georgetown some hope. Gansham Ramsamooj restored some balance fot the batsmen with a knock of 24 runs, before the two Vijay Singhs, lead by the skipper, steered Apollo to victory.

Gopi had scored an exact century for Apollo in a tight quarter-final aginst Wanderers, won by just 1 wicket. Ramsamooj scored 40 not out in that match..

Ontario Provincial MP Mario Sergio presented the trophies in post-game ceremonies. Irfan Rabbini was named MVP (most valuable player) for the Premier Final. Earlier this summer he set a Canadian individual record score of 304 runs batting for Apollo's Division 1 team against United. Rabini took 2 wickets as well as being top-scorer for Apollo.

Brampton Masters beat Avengers/Indo-Pak by 5 wickets to win the First Division title, on an adjacent pitch at Keele Reservoir, Toronto. Avengers/Indo-Pak made 161 all out in 37.2 overs. Zeshan Arshad, a 17-year old, took 5 wickets for 35 runs in 10 overs. Masters polished off the runs during the 22nd over. Salman Arshad hit 93 runs in just 49 balls as his side cantered to 167 runs for 5 wickets, the First Division Championship and promotion to the Premier Division.

Masters also fielded the Premier Championship winning team in the Toronto and District Cricket Association this season.

Stallions had already beaten Indo-Pak by 12 runs to take the Commonwealth Association's Second Division.

Eddie Norfolk


Commonwealth Cricket Association -- Posted Saturday, October 6 2007

Apollo beat Georgetown by 3 wickets to secure the Canadian Commonwealth Cricket Association of Toronto's Premier Division championship on Sept 30.

A century stand for the third wicket between Irfan Rabbini (55 runs) and Harvinder Singh (51 runs) provided the backbone for Apollo's innings. Georgetown then made some breakthroughs once the main stand had ended. However Vijay Singh, the Apollo captain, steered his side to victory with an innings of 33 runs not out.

Georgetown opening batsman John Mitchell scored 59 runs, but steady bowling kept the early scoring under control. John was involved in stands of 57 runs for the second wicket and 43 runs for the 3rd wicket with Franklin Lachlan, who wnet on to make 31 runs. Mitchell was the third wicket to fall, then Deodal Gopi struck with three quick wickets, including Lachlan, to change the course of the game. Apollo's bowlers ensured the later batting was unable to push the score beyond 185 runs for 9 wickets in 50 overs. Gopi ended with 4 wickets for 43 runs.

Georgetown opening bowler Alvin Singh dismissed both Apollo opening batsmen for ducks (no runs) to give his team some early momentum. But Harvinder Singh and Rabbini began to gain control.

After Harvinder Singh had been caught at long-off, driving Mitchell, Alan Mohammed took 3 wickets, including that of Rabbini, to give Georgetown some hope. Gansham Ramsamooj restored some balance fot the batsmen with a knock of 24 runs, before the two Vijay Singhs, lead by the skipper, steered Apollo to victory.

Gopi had scored an exact century for Apollo in a tight quarter-final aginst Wanderers, won by just 1 wicket. Ramsamooj scored 40 not out in that match..

Ontario Provincial MP Mario Sergio presented the trophies in post-game ceremonies. Irfan Rabbini was named MVP (most valuable player) for the Premier Final. Earlier this summer he set a Canadian individual record score of 304 runs batting for Apollo's Division 1 team against United. Rabini took 2 wickets as well as being top-scorer for Apollo.

Brampton Masters beat Avengers/Indo-Pak by 5 wickets to win the First Division title, on an adjacent pitch at Keele Reservoir, Toronto.

Avengers/Indo-Pak made 161 all out in 37.2 overs. Zeshan Arshad, a 17-year old, took 5 wickets for 35 runs in 10 overs.

Masters polished off the runs during the 22nd over. Salman Arshad hit 93 runs in just 49 balls as his side cantered to 167 runs for 5 wickets, the First Division Championship and promotion to the Premier Division.

Masters also fielded the Premier Championship winning team in the Toronto and District Cricket Association this season.

Stallions had already beaten Indo-Pak by 12 runs to take the Commonwealth Association's Second Division.

Eddie Norfolk


Canadian Squad set for Kenya and Namibia -- Posted Saturday, October 6 2007

The Canadian men's cricket team leaves for matches in Kenya and Namibia on Sunday (Oct 7). Several changes were necessary from the original squad named by the Canadian Cricket Association. The final squad contains mostly players from Ontario, more specifically from the Toronto and District Cricket Association (T&DCA).

Two of the three Quebec Cricket Federation (QCF) players in the squad, Qaiser Ali and Abdul Jabbar Chaudhrey have appeared for Overseas CC in the T&DCA this season. Ali and Jabbar normally play for QCF champions Adastrians. Krunalbhai Patel is the third QCF player in the squad.

Pubudu Dassanayake is the coach. The team is captained by Sunil Dhaniram (Cavaliers) with Ali as vice-captain.

The team plays ICC Intercontinental Cup matches with Kenya in Nairobi (Oct 12-15) and Namibia in Windhoek (Oct 25-29).

Three ODIs are set for consecutive days in Nairobi on Oct 17, 18 and 19. This is a heavy schedule and allows little time for acclimatizing or resting between matches.

Some of the withdrawals from the side originally named by the Canadian Cricket Association reflect the fact that some players were not confirmed as available before the squad was made public. Some of the replacements were also not pre-advised. At least one of the players did not know where Namibia is. He then seemed to know it under an old colonial name.

What price player relations?

Squad:
Ontario-based (all play for T&DCA clubs) Sunil Dhaniram (captain), Ashif Mulla, Trevin Bastiampillai, Mohammed Iqbal, Umar Bhatti, Henry Osinde, Jason Patraj, Aftab Shamshudeen, Durand Soraine, Calvert Hooper, Arvind Kandappah
Quebec-based: Qaiser Ali (vice-captain), Abdul Jabbar Chaudrey and Krunalbhai Patel.

Eddie Norfolk


Cricket Management Course -- Posted Friday, October 5 2007


Learn to manage Cricket teams at an international level, administer your countries domestic competitions, and oversee all cricket operations at the local or international level.

You do not need to relocate, this course can be taken from anywhere in the world.

The Cricket Management Course is a fully accredited 8 week online course that offers cutting edge theories on how to develop a career in professional and amateur cricket. The Cricket Management Course will cover issues including cricket team operations, cricket club management, talent identification, team sponsorship, umpiring, coaching, junior cricket, women’s cricket, new technologies of recruiting, traditional recruiting, the business of running a cricket club and other essential tools of modern administrators of professional and amateur cricket clubs.

As cricket grows globally, so do business opportunites within the game. Whether you want to work at Lord's, Eden Gardens, Sabina Park, Bellerive Oval, Old Wanderers, or just increase the involvement of your school cricket program this 8 week online course will launch your cricket success. You will learn the skills and stategies which are needed to advance cricket worldwide.

This course is for you if you want to pursue a career
Professional Cricket Administration
Amateur Club Cricket Administration
Cricket Schools and Camps
Junior Cricket & Women’s Cricket
Team or Club Management
Cricket Agent
Cricket umpire
Cricket Game Day Operations
Cricket Sports Marketing and commercial opportunities
How to run your own cricket club more efficiently
Cricket Media & Community Relations
Cricket career advancement opportunities
Professionally Recruit Cricket players and professionally manage a Cricket club:

Those individuals with a passion for the game of cricket need insider knowledge on cricket club operations, cricket recruiting, player management and evaluation and the overall business of cricket. If you want to further your career in cricket you need to learn and be mentored by those successful in the game. This 8 week online course could be the foundation or the advancement of an exciting career in cricket.

Cricket Agents and recruiters need to know how to objectively recruit players from all over the world. They also need to know how technology is affecting the cricket clubs budgets. Every successful business, including the business of Cricket, has a winning formula. This course will teach you the successes and failures of the most successful cricket teams and programs in the world.

What you will learn:
Revenue-raising and new business activities for cricket
Cricket recruiting, player evaluation, player ratings and in-depth analysis
Relationships between cricket leagues in Australia, India, England, Pakistan, Bangladesh, Sri Lanka, New Zealand, South Africa, Zimbabwe, West Indies, Netherlands, Israel, Nepal, and Argentina
Cricket contracts, player trades and acquisitions, and player salaries and negotiations
Cricket pitch and ground operations
Responsibilities of cricket club management, CEO and all player personnel
All elite-level men's and women's cricket operations, including management of Test and one-day international teams
Handling public relations & media rights
Acquiring and servicing Cricket commercial partners and endorsements
Cricket Advertising strategies
Cricket event management for international matches
Cricket Promotions, Merchandising & Operations
Cricket contracts and player negotiation
Managing cricket at an international level
To administer your countries domestic competitions
Programming for international and domestic cricket
Playing conditions for international and interstate cricket
Pre-tour inspections
Cricketers' Association relationship management
Collective Bargaining Agreements
Code of Conducts
Cricket Academies
Umpiring
Increasing cricket participation across the world
World-class development programs for players, coaches and umpires
Oversee the implementation of various strategic initiatives involving new Cricket technology
Strategic communications and publicity
Internet management and corporate hospitality

Course Instructors:
The course instructors, Jimmy Adams, Roger Barnes and Dr. Lynn Lashbrook
Roger Barnes, cricket agent and co-founder of Sports International Management Ltd., in London, began his career in accountancy. Roger's knowledge and expertise ranges from a junior partnership of Adams, Barnes & Company to the Finance and Administration Director of G Munch Jorgensen International Ltd., an international finance company. A passion for cricket led to a professional change of direction and Roger focused his financial expertise in assisting his cricket clients. From there he became the founder of a successful and respected sports management company, Master Sports. Roger has now been involved in sports management for over ten years and has represented many first class and legendary cricketers.

Roger currently represents:
Jimmy Adams
Michael Holding
Jeffrey Dujon
Courtney Walsh
Brian Lara
Colin Croft
Phil Simmons
Carlton Baugh

Roger has a vast experience of sports player representation, negotiation of contracts and interaction with the media. He has worked to clinch sponsorship and endorsement deals for his various cricket clients and has organized various sports events. His experience renders him an ideal bureau for cricket representation and contractual advice. Roger will share with students the agent side of the cricket business including endorsements, contracts, event planning and sponsorship. For those of you interested in changing professional careers due to a passion for cricket, Roger will be a great mentor.
(www.s-i-m-l.com)

We are proud to offer tuition assistance through the Wells Fargo Education Career Loan program. With the online application, you can get five minute pre-approval, 24 hours a day, seven days a week -- or by phone six days a week. Click here for full details. (We recommend a co-signer for great rates!)

Academic Credit
Western Oregon University, which is part of the Oregon University System, has approved this course for academic credit. Students wishing to earn credit will need to register for the credit directly through Western Oregon University and pay an additional fee of $45 per credit. Students enrolling in this course should consult with their academic advisors to determine what requirements the course may fulfill. That decision is at the discretion of the university accepting the transfer credit. For more details contact Sports Management Worldwide at 1-888-952-4368.

Article sourced from:-
http://www.sportsmanagementworldwide.com/coursedescription_cricketgm.asp?OVRAW=Cricket%20Game&OVKEY=cricket%20game&OVMTC=standard&OVADID=3607183011


Toronto and District Cricket Association -- Posted Thursday, October 4 2007

Toronto and District Cricket Association
Constitution, By-Law and Match Play Rules Amendments

To: All T&DCA Clubs
Subject: Constitution, By-Law and Match Play Rules Amendments Date: September 25, 2007

The 2007 T&DCA Cricket Season on the field has come to an end. It is now time to reflect how we, as an organization, could contribute towards improving our Constitution, By-laws, which was last updated in 1991, and improve upon our match play rules.

During the season, I have heard many views on what needs to be done to change what is outdated in our Constitution and By-laws, modify existing rules, so that we can have a level playing field for all Clubs.

The Board of Governors are soliciting your input, in writing, regarding the above by October 09, 2007.

Your views will be reviewed and considered for inclusion in the documents for 2008. All changes should be sent in writing to the Correspondence Secretary of the T&DCA by October 09

Please use the above Subject name in your response, and refer to the article #, or section you are proposing to change. Final changes will be presented to the member Clubs for approval at the AGM

Information sourced from:-
http://www.cricketstar.net/tdca/


History of the Ottawa Valley Cricket Council -- Posted Wednesday, October 3 2007

In the twenties, a modest expansion of Ottawa cricket took place. Three new clubs, Defense (formerly Militia), Christ Church Cathedral and New Edinburgh were formed and they still operate at the present time. In order to organize the cricket, which was now on League scale, the Ottawa Valley Cricket Council had been formed in 1920, the original constitution of which was drawn up in 1923.

A Governor-General of the inter-war period who took a keen interest in Ottawa cricket was Lord Willingdon who had been a member for four years in the Cambridge University XI.

The second World War posed serious problems for the administrators of the game in Ottawa, not the least of which was the loss of so many players. The situation was, however, saved by the influx of Commonwealth players who were serving in the armed forces. Much was owed, too, to the encouragement of Lord Athlone, the Governor-General, who donated trophies for annual competition in batting, bowling and fielding.

The Ottawa Valley Cricket Council is now the smallest of the five leagues in the Ontario Cricket Association and nobody will pretend that cricket now plays a significant part in the life of Canada’s capital or that its expansion, such as it has been, has kept pace with the growth of the City itself. It has, however, continuously provided a great source of enjoyment for many persons in beautiful surroundings and over a long period of time. At Rideau Hall, Ottawa posses a ground which has a setting as fine as any in Canada, of not in the world, and the game has a long and honorable history, which is intimately linked with successive Governors- General.


A Short History of the Game of Cricket in Canada

The ancient sport of Creag evolved gradually into cricket as we know it today. According to court proceedings at Guildford in 1598, boys played Creag there in 1550.
Cricket is worldwide and has been played in the most unlikely locations. From places like Riga, Sofia, Jerez to East Greenland, West Spitzbergen and Salonika. Ships companies of the H.M.S. Fury and Hecla played on the Polar cap on March 15th of 1823. The journal of the second voyage for the Discovery of the North West passage shows the intrepid explorers playing cricket on the pack ice, within the Arctic circle in 1824. By 1850 cricket was being played in Australia, South Africa, Incia and the West Indies. In 1859 Parr and Widsen’s team left England for the shores of Canada and the United States – that being the first cricket tour.

The French Canadians have not completely shunned the game, as early as 1785 – or three years before the first settlement at Botany Bay they played cricket after Sunday mass in Montréal. There was a thirty year void without any written records of Canadian cricket until 1819 when the Duke of Richmond, then Governor General, played at Kingston, Ontario. By 1831 cricket was in fact being taught in schools. By 1867 the game was declared the national sport of the country by the first Prime Minister, Sir John A MacDonald.

Sir C. Aubrey Smith, who captained England in the first test against South Africa in 1889, gingered up cricket in Southern California. In Hollywood he founded a club that included: David Niven, Cary Grant, George Sanders and Basil Rathbone among others.

Cricket like no other sport has had a rich history of literature and no greater contribution has been made to it than that of John Nyren and Sir Nevile Cardus. Cricket has been mastered over the years and the deeds of the greats have been immortalized with their names. Name like: Grace, Hobbs, Ranjitsinhji, Bradman and Constantine.

Searching for the essence of cricket definitions as diverse and subtle as the game itself have flourished. An example “You have two sides, one out in the field and one in. Each man that’s in the side that’s in goes out and when he’s out he comes in and the next man goes in until he’s out. When they are all out the side that’s out comes in and the side that’s been in goes out and tries to get those coming in, out. Sometimes you get men still in and not out. When both sides have been in and out including the not outs that’s the end of the game.”

In a more serious vein, apprehend the truth of John Arlott’s declaration “No man should call the game dull who is not prepared to understand it. Twenty two good cricketers cannot be uninterested to watch, but they are sometimes too subtly skillful to appeal to the eye of the sensation hunter. Watching cricket is a quiet pursuit. When the eyes have seen it all it still remains for the contemplative mind to transmute what is seen into contemplative enjoyment.”

The noble game has long symbolized team effort but paradoxically cricket is also the sport of the individualist and the phrase “not cricket” has become synonymous with “unfair play”.

At no other time in it’s history has cricket been badgered by such pernickety pressures. In the recent past the very soul of cricket has been preyed upon – a soul too extraordinary to be categorized. Hugh McIlvanney says “The floods of banknotes washed the athletes towards an entirely understandable but un-heroic pragmatism. The went for the loot and let the glory look after itself. The simple truth is that cricket cannot withstand such values. It has always been a ferociously hard game but the hardness has to be confined within delicately drawn lines. Ina contest of such subtle complexity, sportsmanship is no mere sentimental indulgence. It is as basic as the bat and ball. Without it the essence of the game dissolves as in acid. Something marketable may be left but it won’t be cricket.”

In a similar fashion Scyld Berry has this to say “Cricket like a subtle work o nature is too intricate to be tampered with. The ball, the center of attention has been the only red thing on the field. Change the ball and cricket’s whole color scheme is upset. It will be a matter of endlessly cutting down the table legs to set it right again.”

Author - Manzoor Khan

Article sourced from:-
http://www.ottawacricket.org/en/ovcchistory.htm


Heartlake Cricket Club -- Posted Wednesday, October 3 2007

Brampton-based Heartlake CC successfully 'invaded' Centennial Park, Etobicoke on Saturday (September 29) to beat Elmbank CC by 5 wickets in the final of the Etobicoke and District Cricket League. On a pleasant sunny day, Elmbank won the toss and elected to bat, but failed to post a solid total, not even batting through half the allowed 50 overs.

A score of 122 all out (24 overs) was unlikely to be enough, unless something of a miracle occurred. For one ball, the miracle had a chance, a loose shot from the first ball saw Orlando Browne caught in the cover for nought. Ten runs came off the rest of the opening over.

A miracle could be on the cards if that rate of progress continued. Some more unlikely scores than all out for 100 off 10 overs have been known in cricket's rich history. But surely someone would come to the fore to bring home the silverware?

Eddie Williams, the other opening batsman, proved a hero. Together with Thomas Checkley, he moved the total to 49 runs, before Checkley was out for 12 runs. Progress continued, from a Heartlake perspective, towards the winning target in tandem with Gilmore Stapleton. This, despite tight bowling from Okechukwa Ahuchoga, who bowled 9 overs for just 21 runs. Canadian international all-rounder Abdool Samad produced a few balls that asked questions, and rapped a couple of fingers, in conceding just 16 runs off 5 overs.

But at the drinks break, Heartlake was in the driving seat with just 2 wickets lost. Surely the win was in sight, even in the ever wondrous world of Canadian cricket?

Williams charged the bowler when play resumed but insted of adding to his eight boundaries, or even putting the ball into space for a six, he was left high and dry, stumped by the wicketkeeper.

Stapleton and Eion Katchay added a few runs and the total passed one hundred. Katchay took a stroll to the striker's end to enquire of his teammate's health. Stapleton had a problem with a leg or muscle and eventually moved off the field in some discomfort. Retired hurt. A maroon helmeted batsman came out to replace him.

Play resumed and, to the delight of the Elmbank players, the next ball was inside edged onto a thigh and caught by the wicketkeeper standing up. Long-on called out that the necessary 'miracle' might be on the cards as a right-handed batsman with no headgear departed the scene. What had happened to the maroon helmet, as in my notes?

It was being worn at the non-strikers end. So when the next over began, those who did not know off the top of their heads that the maroon helmeted batsman was a left-hander, soon found out! Discussion at the southern end of the ground with fellow spectators, confirmed the wrong player had faced the bowling after Stapleton retired hurt. Video evidence confirmed this. Indeed some Elmbank players were showing John how to bat right-handed!

But Okechukwa had gained a deserved wicket.

John kept the prospect of a miracle alive when bowled by Mattrasingh for just the one boundary shot. Perhaps he was overconfident after blasting 118 runs in the previous weekend's semi-final against GT Sports.

A ball or two later came a call of wide. This brought some strange looks for the umpire from both bowler and wicketkeeper. A cry of 'he's woken up' came from a seated spectator at the southern end of the ground.

Stapleton had returned to bat. His running improved after a scratchy first run. This was cricketing magic par excellence. Why hasn't he got a runner, someone asked?

Perhaps a runner might have added to the confusion. With victory on the doorstep, it was time for a fierce drive back to the bowler but the catch was not accepted. The bowler was in anguish but it was too late. A boundary was conceded and that was it. Stapleton was 23 runs not out. Heartlake had won.

In the semi-finals, played the previous weekend, both Heartlake and Elmbank had passed the 300-run mark. But on the big day, Elmbank's batting faltered against steady opening bowling.

There was a steady flow of wickets, rather than runs. Dotun Olatunsi, batting a number five, was the first to make double figures. Canadian international Abdool Samad, scorer of 140 runs not out in semi-final action, then entered the scene but was soon out lbw to Katchay for just 6 runs.

Okechukwa Ahuchogu played some defiant strokes enroute to top scoring with 28 runs, including four boundaries. He had support from Hanif Julian. Julian hit the only six of the innings, into the bush and trees beyond the deep mid-wicket boundary.

Stapleton returned to dismiss both Ahuchogu and Julian. Former Australian captain Richie Benaud would have cried not only to see a side out for just 24 of a possible 50 overs, but that the last wicket pair managed to end the innings with a silly run out.

First-change bowler Charles Enos took 3 wickets for 28 runs in 6 overs. Stapleton took 2 wickets for 16 runs in 6 overs. Katchay's 3 wickets for 63 runs included about half the Elmbank total. Eight wides and six no-balls padded his bowling figures, as did a few of the late blows by the tail enders.

Sometimes it is just not your day. Next year now beckons for Elmbank, but a conference win and a place in the playoff final is nothing to be ashamed of.

Meanwhile, congratulations to Heartlake.


Young Titans takes Etobicoke First Division Title

Mention should also be given to Young Titans who took the First Division title on the adjacent field at Centennial Park, Etobicoke, against Cosmos. Cosmos made 131 runs all out.

After 18 overs, Titans had scored 73 runs but lost 5 wickets, when I diverted from the Premier Final for an update on the game situation.

Two of the lower order batsmen brought home victory by following the basics of playing down the line of the ball. There were a couple of exceptions, swishes at the ball, which might have cost Young Titans the match. There was tension on both sides, climaxing as Titans moved to 134 runs for 7 wickets, and the victory.

A three-wicket win masks the fact that one of those wickets belonged to someone who had retired hut. His right eye was closed, but in the end he did not have to return to the batting crease.

The match-clinching partnership saw Ankur reach 15 runs not out and Tahir 20 runs not out. Opening batsman Lalit made 40 runs. Cosmos' Tarish took 4 wickets for 39 runs.




A Footnote on the Etobicoke and District Premier Final

I had arrived slightly late for the Etobicoke and District Premier Final, needing to deliver something in downtown Toronto. A 'quick check' on the internet was slowed by noting news of the death of Derek Shackleton, a very steady seam bowler who played for ever, seemingly, for Hampshire but a mere handful of games for England. I forwarded a note on how the likes of Shackleton, and Tom Cartwright (Warwickshire and England) would not concede anything close to 47 wides in a total of 90 runs, even with the tighter calling of wides in one-day cricket.

Heartlake conceded 23 extras in 24 overs as Elmbank was dismissed for 122 runs, and Elmbank conceded 19 extras, all wides, in 27 overs. The Heartlake bowling included 12 wides and 11 no-balls. One of the no-balls was correctly called as it was well above waist height. It was very loose down the legside and was put away for 4 runs, thus giving 5 runs away and an extra ball to be bowled.

I heard a lot of international coaches imploring bowlers to cut out the wides, in particular, during the winter. New Zealand skipper Stephen Fleming was really unhappy at a no-ball that 'bowled' John Davison in St Lucia. JD went on to a quick 50. We can't afford to do that in the next phase, a semi-final or a final was his message.

On Saturday, some team officials and supporters cried out, sometimes seemingly in vain, for some of the bowlers to keep the ball on a good line. If you only have three men on the legside, the idea is you bowl towards the off stump, otherwise the runs might flow on the leg, not only from the wides. As the Division One final moved towards a close, the Young Titans players and fans recognized that if the batsmen stuck it out for the potential last 13-15 overs, there would surely be enough wides to win the game.

By the standards of many games I've seen this summer,the wides and no-balls tally in the Premier game wasn't so bad. In some games, just playing a straight bat might bring a total of 150 in 50 overs. And it the opposition like playing across the line, another trial and tribulation for coaches, the straight bat side could win.....as long as it bowls a fairly straight line and length.

Indeed, although Heartlake won, how many of the 5 wickets lost in making the winning score were really gifted to Elmbank? The catch at the wicket was genuine. A couple of other wickets fell to decent deliveries, but was there a need for the batsmen to be forcing the pace?

If I had a pound or a dollar (Canadian ones will do, as the US one is struggling) for each wide I have seen since going to South Africa last November......and a dollar for each wicket given away for no great reason.....Dream on. But next season, things can improve, can't they?

Eddie Norfolk


Ottawa Cricket -- Posted Tuesday, October 2 2007
League and Knockout Champions -Canterbury Cricket Club

Some facts about Canterbury Cricket Club in Ottawa.



Accomplishments 2006

Winners of 2006 – Challenge Cup Final

Winners of 2006 - Six a Side championship.

Runners up OCA Championship.

Defeated Hamilton & District, & SOCA – Sunrise Cricket Club to reach Final.

No loss in Challenge Cup after 1st week of June 2006 for 2006 season.

Total matches played in 2007 14 Wins 11 losses

Winners of 2007 – Challenge Cup Final

Winners of 2007 - Knockout Cup Final

Runners up 2007 J.R.R Eastern Conference Championship. Defeated Adastrians Cricket Club to reach Final.

No loss in 2007 Challenge Cup League, Playoffs, & Knockout Cup. Total played/wins – 17/17/0

2006 Season
"Matches Played" 14
"Wins" 11
"Losses" 3


2007 Season
"Matches Played" 17
"Wins" 17
"Losses" 0




Members Representing Ontario

Akber Hussain

Rochak Mehta

Vikram Arora



Current Members Representing Ottawa Valley Cricket Council

Akhtar Mufti

Pavanveer Singh Rana.




Information provided by:-

Vikram Arora, Vice President Marketing and Promotions
Canterbury Cricket Club




The history of the game -- Posted Monday, October 1 2007

Cricket literature - the 18th century

AR Littlewood

Written and pictorial records of cricket may go back to the Plantagenet period, although it is impossible to distinguish between what may be cricket and its brothers, cat and dog, stool-ball, rounders etc., and even at times its cousins, hockey and golf. The firmest, though still not secure, pictorial evidence is an illustration apparently of a man demonstrating a stroke with a stump to a boy holding a straight club and a ball in a Decretal of Pope Gregory IX that was illuminated in England; while in the Wardrobe Accounts of the Royal Household for the year 1300 the sums of 100 shillings and 6 pounds are mentioned as being spent on "creag" and other sports of Prince Edward (the grandfather of the Black Prince).

In the Tudor period there are references to boys playing "creckett" and in the seventeenth century there are many references such as that by Sir William Dugdale that Oliver Cromwell played cricket in his youth, while in 1653 Sir Thomas Urquhart even makes Gargantua play cricket in his translation of Rabelais. At the very end of this century cricket makes its appearance in the newspapers, a trend that grows rapidly in the eighteenth century but is concerned with announcements of matches, the wagers involved and, occasionally, the ensuing riots rather than with descriptions of matches. Rather different is the "Code of 1744" that contains at least two strata, one of which, wherein for instance the ball is referred to as "she" rather than "it", is clearly rustic rather than metropolitan and may be of considerable antiquity. All this, however, cannot be classed as literature.

Literature begins, for cricket, suddenly, unexpectedly and fully grown, like Minerva from the head of Jupiter, in a Latin poem of 95 lines on a rural cricket match that was written by William Goldwin and published in his Musae Juveniles in March 1706. Little is known of the author: he left Eton for King's College Cambridge in 1700 and subsequently became Master of Bristol Grammar School and then was Vicar of Saint Nicholas, Bristol, until his death in 1747. His poem, In Certamen Pilae (On a Match at Ball), has been translated into English verse by Harold Perry in Etoniana in 1922 and, with copious scholarly notes, again into verse by H.P.-T. (P.F. Thomas) in Early Cricket the following year. In early spring "a chosen cohort of youths, armed with curved bats, ...descends rejoicing to the field". Each team tries to impose its own laws, until a grey-haired Nestor composes the squabble. They mark the pitch and on the stumps place the bail which "cries out for good defence" against "the leathern sphere". Two umpires stand "leaning on their bats" while the scorers "sit on a hummock ready to cut the mounting score on sticks with their little knives". The game begins and a batsman "propels the strident ball afar ...but a clearsighted scout (fieldsman) prepares his ambush in the deep and with outstretched palms joyfully accepts it as it falls ...and grief overwhelms those who silently mourn their friend's disaster". The tale of misfortune continues, and one batsman in going for a second run "falls headlong at the very foot of the wicket. (as) the shaken earth groans beneath his great weight" and the rustic throng exult in laughter". The other side fares better and "Victory , long striven for, noisily flaps its wings and fills the sky with the shouts and roars of success".

Cricket literature in English also gets off to a flying start with the appearance of Cricket: an Heroic Poem. illlustrated with the Critical Observations of Scriblerus Maximus. In 316 lines it describes the earliest match for which individual scores have been recorded, between Kent and England at the Artillery Ground, London, on June 18th 1744. It was written by James Love (really Dance), the bankrupt son of the architect of the Mansion House, who had taken to acting and writing for the stage to earn his living. It contains the much quoted couplet "Hail, cricket! Glorious manly, British Game! / First of all Sports! be first alike in Fame", as it lauds cricket to the detriment of "puny Billiards, where, with sluggish Pace, / The dull Ball trails before the feeble Mace" and even "Tennis self, thy sister sport" that cannot "charm, / Or with thy fierce Delights our Bosoms warm". Its style may, however, be better judged by the description of the fall of the famous lefthander Richard Newland of Slindon:

The champion strikes. When scarce arriving fair,
The glancing ball mounts upward in the air.
The batsman sees it, and with mournful eyes
Fixed on the ascending pellet as it flies,
Thus suppliant claims the favour of the skies
And now illustrious Sackville where he stood
The approaching ball with cautious pleasure viewed,
At once he sees the chiefs impending doom,
And pants for mighty honours yet to come.
Swift as the falcon darting on its prey,
He springs elastic on the verdant way;
Sure of success, flies upward with a bound,
Derides the slow approach, and spurns the ground.
Prone slips the youth, yet glories in his fall,
With arm extended shows the captive ball.

The notes are worth reading, being partly informative of participants in the match and literary inspirations from Vergil and partly mock scholarly like that on Book 2, verse 47:
"A Place there is.) Est in secessu Locus. The Author here has exactly follow'd the Example of all great Poets, both ancient and modern, who never fail to prepare you with a pompous Description of the Place where any great Action is to be perform'd."

A more frivolous poem on a cricket match appeared in 1773 when the Rev. John Duncombe wrote a parody on the ballad Chevy Chace called Burry Triumphant:

The active Earl of Tankerville
An even bet did make,
That in Bourn paddock he would cause
Kent's chief est hands to quake.
And so he did, for:
Of byes and overthows but three
The Kentish heroes gain'd,
And Surry victor on the score,
Twice seventy-five remain'd.
Of near three hundred notches made
By Surry, eight were byes;
The rest were balls, which, boldly struck,
Re-echo'd to the skies!

This called forth a rejoinder from John Burn by, an attorney-at-law in Canterbury. His description of the Duke of Dorset is memorable:

His Grace the Duke of Dorset came,...
Equall'd by few, he plays with glee,
Nor peevish seeks for victory...
And for unlike the Modern way
Of blocking every ball at play,
He firmly stands with bat upright,
And strikes with athletic might,
Sends forth the ball across the mead,
And scores six notches for the deed.

A more unusual match was the subject of an anonymous poem of 1796: it was played between the one-legged and the one armed:

Though bloody deeds by fortress wall
Are parodied when bat and ball
Defend and storm the stubborn wicket.
Thus thought I, when with vision dim,
With feeble step and loss of limb,
Old warriors in the strife contended...

Poems could give advice, on cricket (1772):

Ye bowlers take heed, to my precepts attend,
On you the whole state of the game must depend,
Spare your vigour at first nor exert all your strength,
But measure each step, and be sure pitch a length.
Ye strikers observe when the foe shall draw nigh,
Mark the bowler advance with a vigilant eye;
Your skill all depends upon distance and sight,
Stand firm to your scratch, let your bat be upright.
and even through cricket on life (1756):

The outward side, who place and profit want,
Watch to surprise and labour to supplant;
While those who taste the sweets of present winnings
Labour as heartily to keep their innings.
On either side the whole great game is play'd -
Untry'd no shift is left, unsought no aid;
Skill vies with skill, and pow'r contends with pow'r ,
And squint-eyed prejudice computes their score.

The enthusiasm for cricket in the eighteenth century is well represented by a letter from Mary Turner of East Hoathly to her son in September 1739: "Last Munday youre Father was at Mr Payns and plaid at Cricket and come home pleased anuf for he struck the best Ball in the game and whished he had not anny thing else to do he wuld play Cricket all his life".

However, the active participation in cricket of members of the nobility called forth adverse criticism from both poets and poetasters. Alexander Pope attacks probably Lord John Sackville in his "The Judge to dance his brother serjeant call, / The Senator at cricket urge the ball", while in 1778 a lampooner inveighs against the Duke of Dorset in his The Noble Cricketers:

When Death (for Lords must die) your doom shall seal,
What sculptured Honors shall your tomb reveal?
Instead of Glory , with a weeping eye,
Instead of Virtue pointing to the sky,
Let Bats and Balls th' affronted stone disgrace,
While Farce stands leering by, with Satyr face,
Holding, with forty notches mark'd, a board -
The noble triumph of a noble Lord!

The last words for the eighteenth century must, however, be for its most famous club, Hambledon, for which the Rev. Reynell Cotton, master of Hyde Abbey School, Winchester, wrote his Cricket Song:
...The wickets are pitch'd now, and measured the ground;
Then they form a large ring, and stand gazing around -
Since Ajax fought Hector, in sight of all Troy,
No contest was seen with such fear and such joy.
Derry down, etc Then fill up your glass, he's the best that drinks most.

Here's the Hambledon Club! - who refuses the toast ?
Let's join in the praise of the bat and the wicket,
And sing in full chorus the patrons of cricket.
Derry down, etc.

And when the game's o'er, and our fate shall draw nigh
(For the heroes of cricket, like others, must die),
Our bats we'll resign, neither troubled nor vex'd,
And give up our wickets to those that come next.
Derry down, etc.

Article sourced from:-
http://content-usa.cricinfo.com/ci/content/story/89662.html


Antony R Littlewood is a professor at the University of Western Ontario (JH)